Home PageComprehensive Plan

Town of Wood River - Year 2030

Comprehensive Plan

Town of Wood River

Burnett County, WI

December 2009

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Town of Wood River Year 2030

Comprehensive Plan

Contents

Page

1. Issues and Opportunities ...................................................................................................... 1-1

1.1 Introduction................................................................................................................... 1-1

1.2 Plan Summary............................................................................................................... 1-2

1.3 Town of Wood River 2030 Vision................................................................................ 1-3

1.4 Comprehensive Plan Development Process and Public Participation .......................... 1-7

1.5 Town of Wood River Issues and Opportunities............................................................ 1-8

1.6 Issues and Opportunities Policies and Recommendations.......................................... 1-10

2. Population and Housing ....................................................................................................... 2-1

2.1 Population and Housing Plan........................................................................................ 2-1

2.2 Population Characteristics Summary............................................................................ 2-1

2.3 Housing Characteristics Summary................................................................................ 2-5

2.4 Population and Housing Trends and Outlook............................................................... 2-7

2.5 Housing for All Income Levels..................................................................................... 2-8

2.6 Housing for All Age Groups and Persons with Special Needs..................................... 2-9

2.7 Promoting Availability of Land for Development/Redevelopment of Low-Income and

Moderate-Income Housing ........................................................................................... 2-9

2.8 Maintaining and Rehabilitating the Existing Housing Stock........................................ 2-9

2.9 Population and Housing Goals and Objectives........................................................... 2-10

2.10 Population and Housing Policies and Recommendations........................................... 2-11

2.11 Population and Housing Programs.............................................................................. 2-12

3. Transportation ...................................................................................................................... 3-1

3.1 Transportation Plan....................................................................................................... 3-1

3.2 Planned Transportation Improvements ......................................................................... 3-2

3.3 Comparison with County, State, and Regional Transportation Plans........................... 3-2

3.4 Transportation Goals and Objectives............................................................................ 3-2

3.5 Transportation Policies and Recommendations............................................................ 3-3

3.6 Transportation Programs............................................................................................... 3-6

4. Utilities and Community Facilities....................................................................................... 4-1

4.1 Utilities and Community Facilities Plan ....................................................................... 4-1

4.2 Planned Utility and Community Facility Improvements .............................................. 4-5

4.3 Utilities and Community Facilities Goals and Objectives.......................................... 4-11

4.4 Utilities and Community Facilities Policies and Recommendations.......................... 4-14

4.5 Utilities and Community Facilities Programs............................................................. 4-16

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5. Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources ..................................................................... 5-1

5.1 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Plan...................................................... 5-1

5.2 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Goals and Objectives .......................... 5-3

5.3 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Policies and Recommendations .......... 5-6

5.4 Agriculture, Natural, and Cultural Resources Programs ............................................ 5-10

6. Economic Development ....................................................................................................... 6-1

6.1 Economic Development Plan........................................................................................ 6-1

6.2 Economic Characteristics Summary ............................................................................. 6-2

6.3 Desired Business and Industry...................................................................................... 6-5

6.4 Sites for Business and Industrial Development ............................................................ 6-6

6.5 Economic Development Goals and Objectives............................................................. 6-6

6.6 Economic Development Policies and Recommendations............................................. 6-9

6.7 Economic Development Programs ............................................................................. 6-11

7. Intergovernmental Cooperation............................................................................................ 7-1

7.1 Intergovernmental Cooperation Plan ............................................................................ 7-1

7.2 Inventory of Existing Intergovernmental Agreements ................................................. 7-1

7.3 Analysis of the Relationship with School Districts and Adjacent Local Governmental

Units............................................................................................................................. 7-2

7.4 Intergovernmental Opportunities, Conflicts, and Resolutions...................................... 7-2

7.5 Intergovernmental Cooperation Goals and Objectives ................................................. 7-6

7.6 Intergovernmental Cooperation Policies and Recommendations ................................. 7-7

7.7 Intergovernmental Cooperation Programs.................................................................... 7-8

8. Land Use.............................................................................................................................. 8-1

8.1 Introduction................................................................................................................... 8-1

8.2 Existing Land Use......................................................................................................... 8-1

8.3 Land Ownership and Management ............................................................................... 8-5

8.4 Projected Supply and Demand of Land Uses ............................................................... 8-6

8.5 Density Management - A Different Approach to Managing Development.................. 8-8

8.6 Cluster/Conservation Development .............................................................................. 8-9

8.7 Future Land Use Plan.................................................................................................... 8-9

8.8 Future Land Use Management Areas ......................................................................... 8-13

8.9 Existing and Potential Land Use Conflicts ................................................................. 8-16

8.10 Opportunities for Redevelopment............................................................................... 8-17

8.11 Land Use Goals and Objectives.................................................................................. 8-17

8.12 Land Use Policies and Recommendations.................................................................. 8-19

8.13 Land Use Programs..................................................................................................... 8-21

9. Implementation.................................................................................................................... 9-1

9.1 Action Plan.................................................................................................................... 9-1

9.2 Status and Changes to Land Use Programs and Regulations ....................................... 9-5

9.3 Non-Regulatory Land Use Management Tools .......................................................... 9-17

9.4 Comprehensive Plan Amendments and Updates ........................................................ 9-18

9.5 Integration and Consistency of Planning Elements .................................................... 9-19

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9.6 Measurement of Plan Progress.................................................................................... 9-21

9.7 Implementation Goals and Objectives ........................................................................ 9-22

9.8 Implementation Policies and Recommendations ........................................................ 9-23

Tables

Table 1-1 Issues and Opportunities Identification Town of Wood River.............................. 1-9

Table 2-1 Population Counts, Burnett County, 1970-2007 ................................................... 2-3

Table 2-2 Housing Supply, Occupancy, and Tenure, Town of Wood River, 1990 and 20002-5

Table 2-3 Housing Supply, Occupancy, and Tenure, Burnett County, 1990 and 2000 ........ 2-5

Table 6-1 Educational Attainment of Persons Age 25 and Over, Burnett County and

Town of Wood River, 2000................................................................................... 6-3

Table 6-2 Employment by Industry, Town of Wood River, Burnett County, and

Wisconsin, 2000 ....................................................................................................6-4

Table 6-3 Employment by Occupation, Town of Wood River, Burnett County, and

Wisconsin, 2000 .................................................................................................... 6-5

Table 8-1 Existing Land Use, Town of Wood River, 2008................................................... 8-1

Table 8-2 Land Ownership and Management........................................................................ 8-6

Table 8-3 Projected Land Use Demand (acres) Town of Wood River 2008-2030 ............... 8-7

Table 8-4 Land Supply and Demand Comparison Town of Wood River ............................. 8-7

Table 8-5 Future Land Use, Town of Wood River 2030..................................................... 8-16

Table 9-1 Zoning, Town of Wood River ............................................................................... 9-6

Figures

Figure 2-1 Population, Town of Wood River, 1970-2008 ...................................................... 2-2

Figure 2-2 Comparative Population Forecast, 2000-2030

Town of Wood River Population Forecasts .......................................................... 2-4

Figure 2-3 Units in Structure, Town of Wood River, 2000 .................................................... 2-6

Figure 2-4 Comparative Housing Forecast, 2000-2030.......................................................... 2-7

Figure 8-1 Existing Land Use, Town of Wood River, 2008................................................... 8-2

Figure 8-2 Future Land Use, Town of Wood River 2030..................................................... 8-16

Figure 9-2 County Zoning Coordination Evaluation Criteria ................................................. 9-9

Figure 9-3 Burnett County Comprehensive Planning County/Local Coordinated Decision

Making Process ................................................................................................... 9-11

Figure 9-4 Typical Site Design Example .............................................................................. 9-13

Maps

Map 4-1 Community Facilities and Services............................................................................... 4-3

Map 4-2 Planned Community Facility and Transportation Improvements ................................. 4-9

Map 8-1 Existing Land Use ......................................................................................................... 8-3

Map 8-2 Future Land Use.......................................................................................................... 8-11

Map 9-1 Existing Land Use Regulations ..................................................................................... 9-7

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Appendices

Public Participation Plan and Survey Results Appendix A

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Element Abbreviations

IO Issues and Opportunities

H Population and Housing

T Transportation

UCF Utilities and Community Facilities

ANC Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources

ED Economic Development

IC Intergovernmental Cooperation

LU Land Use

I Implementation

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1. Issues and Opportunities

1.1 Introduction

The Town of Wood River is defined by the people who live and work there, the houses and

businesses, the parks and natural features, its past, its present, and its future. No matter the

location, change is the one certainty that visits all places. No community is immune to its

effects. How a community changes, how that change is perceived, and how change is managed

are the subjects of community comprehensive planning. The purpose of this planning process is

to ensure an adequate tax base for community services, to balance the needs for jobs, housing,

and recreation, and the need to respect the past while ensuring a quality future. An understanding

of both the town's history and its vision for the future is essential to making sound decisions.

The foundation of comprehensive planning relies on a balance between the past, present, and

future by addressing four fundamental questions:

1. Where is the community now?

2. How did the community get here?

3. Where does the community want to be in the future?

4. How does the community get to where it wants to be?

The

making in the Town of Wood River for the next 20 to 25 years. The town's complete

comprehensive plan is composed of two documents. This

Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan will guide community decisionPlan Recommendations Report

contains the results of the town's decision making process as expressed by goals, objectives,

policies, and recommendations. The

the comprehensive plan and contains all of the background data for Burnett County and the

Town of Wood River. Both documents follow the same basic structure by addressing nine

comprehensive planning elements in chapters one through nine:

1. Issues and Opportunities

2. Population and Housing

3. Transportation

4. Utilities and Community Facilities

5. Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources

6. Economic Development

7. Intergovernmental Cooperation

8. Land Use

9. Implementation

Burnett County began a multi-jurisdictional planning effort in 2008 after being awarded a

Comprehensive Planning Grant by the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The Town of

Wood River joined Burnett County in this effort along with 10 other towns, and two villages for

a total of 14 participating units of government. For more information on the multi-jurisdictional

planning process, please refer to Chapter 1 of the

Inventory and Trends Report is the second component ofInventory and Trends Report.

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1-2 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

The

Comprehensive Planning law, Wisconsin Statutes 66.1001. This law requires all municipalities

(counties, villages, towns, and villages) to adopt a comprehensive plan by the year 2010 if they

wish to make certain land use decisions. After the year 2010, any municipality that regulates

land use must make their zoning, land division, shoreland and floodplain zoning, and official

mapping decisions in a manner that is consistent with the community’s comprehensive plan.

The Town of Wood River developed this comprehensive plan in response to the issues it must

address and the opportunities it wishes to pursue. The Issues and Opportunities element of the

comprehensive plan provides perspective on the planning process, public participation, trends

and forecasts, and the overall goals of the community.

Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan meets the requirements of Wisconsin's

1.2 Plan Summary

The Town of Wood River is an unincorporated town in south-central Burnett County. There are

no incorporated villages within the town, and the Town is situated just east of the Village of

Grantsburg. The town is also bordered by the Town of West Marshland to the north, the Town

of Daniels to the east, the Town of Trade Lake to the south, and the Town of Grantsburg to the

west. Please reference Map 1-1 for the regional setting.

With a population of about 1,039 and a low population density, the Town of Wood River can

best be described as rural. As is typical in southern Burnett County, the landscape is

characterized by a balanced mix of farmland, grassland, wetland, woodland, and surface water,

which includes limited named lakes. Importantly, nearly three-quarters of homes in the Town of

Wood River are seasonal residencies. The population is expected to remain steady, with the

Wisconsin Department of Administration projecting an increase of 4 persons a year. Future

development is also projected to remain steady, with an increase of 2 to 3 houses per year (See

Chapter 2 of the

Residential housing is the primary form of projected future development.

Public participation during the planning process identified the town’s primary concerns and areas

to be addressed by its comprehensive plan. Top issues and opportunities as identified by the

planning committee and town citizens include the protection of natural resources and rural

character, the need for improved land use planning and managing rural development regulation,

and pursuing opportunities for economic development. Town of Wood River residents also

responded to a county-wide planning process survey. The purpose of the survey was to gauge

the general public’s sentiment on a range of key planning-related issues, the results of which

have been used as a tool to help guide and validate the

plan. Appendix A includes the Town’s Public

Participation Plan and local survey results, while the

Burnett County Plan Appendices include the county-wide

results and full survey report. The strongest areas of

survey consensus include the following:

The

2030 Comprehensive Plan

the stage to successfully

balance and achieve results

based on the community’s

vision.

Inventory and Trends Report for detailed population and housing projections).Town of Wood River Yearsets

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are the most important reasons people choose to live in Burnett County.

Natural beauty, recreational opportunities, and the small town atmosphere/rural lifestyle

resources, agriculture, forest resources, and rural areas.

Development density should be managed and balanced in order to preserve natural

service quality is maintained.

The

and achieve the desires expressed in the goals, objectives, polices and recommendations found in

this document. This will be accomplished by creating an improved system in which

development takes place. This will incorporate many innovative techniques involving

development density and lot size management as well as creative subdivision design. Paramount

in the plan is the careful placement of residential development with regard to the community’s

natural features and infrastructure investments. The town’s plan will help achieve a desirable

future by directing the most intensive development to areas that are suitable for such

development. The overall intent is to preserve the features, character, and opportunity that the

residents of Wood River enjoy today while managing the long term physical development in

concert with the market forces and land use regulation that shape it. The best agricultural lands,

natural resource rich areas, and areas that support outdoor recreation opportunities will be

preserved as such for future generations, but will still allow development at lower densities.

Community services should be provided jointly by communities if money can be saved &Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan sets the stage to successfully balance

1.3 Town of Wood River 2030 Vision

The Town of Wood River planning committee developed a vision statement as a part of the

comprehensive planning process. Based on the town’s highest priority issues and opportunities,

the group identified what they would like to change, create, or preserve for the future of their

community. The vision statement then expresses which issues are the most important for the

town to resolve and which opportunities are most important to pursue over the long term.

Vision Statement

It is the year 2030. In the Town of Wood River we have a beautiful and safe community closely

connected to farmlands, lakes and forested areas, the Town of Wood River is a unique rural

community committed to protecting and enhancing its agricultural, natural resources and quality

of life. The Town of Wood River will endeavor to accomplish this vision by preserving its

agricultural and natural resources while supporting responsible residential and commercial

growth and development in appropriate designated areas.

The Town of Wood River will support this vision through reliance on intergovernmental

cooperation and public participation.

The Town of Wood River’s vision for the future is further expressed in its goal statements for

each of the comprehensive planning elements. The town’s planning goals are broad statements

of community values and public preferences for the long term (20 years or more).

Implementation of this comprehensive plan will result in the achievement of these goals by the

year 2030. For further detail on these goals, including related objectives, refer to the respective

element of this comprehensive plan.

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Housing Goals

Goal 1:

needs of the current and future residents to have access to a full range of housing choices

for all income levels, age groups and special needs for those who wish to reside in a rural

atmosphere.

Facilitate opportunities for an adequate housing program that will meet the

Goal 2:

fashion that does not impact scarce agricultural lands or natural resources.

To guide new housing development into areas that can be efficiently served in a

Goal 3:

existing housing stock.

When reasonable support the maintenance and rehabilitation of the town’s

Transportation Goals

Goal 1:

which, development pattern and meet anticipated transportation demand generated by

existing and planned land uses.

Provide for a safe, efficient, and environmentally sound transportation system

Goal 2:

appropriate.

Provide safe and efficient multi-modal transportation systems where

Goal 3:

towns in developing the Town transportation system.

Promote cooperation and coordination between state, county, villages, and

Utilities and Community Facilities Goals

Goal 1:

community facilities and services, and utilities.

Support the efficiency, quality and coordinated planning of town government,

Goal 2:

Support quality and accessible parks and recreational facilities

Goal 3:

water.

Promote proper disposal of wastewater to protect ground water and surface

Goal 4:

needs of residents, businesses, industry, and agriculture.

Promote a town water supply that remains drinkable, and is available to meet the

Goal 5:

from flooding.

Ensure that roads, structures, and other improvements are reasonably protected

Goal 6:

public health, natural environment, and general appearance of land use in the town.

Promote effective solid waste disposal and recycling services that protect the

Goal 7:

adequately serve existing and planned development.

Support the provision of reliable, efficient, and well-planned utilities to

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Goal 8:

Support access to quality health and child care facilities.

Goal 9:

meets the needs of existing and planned future development patterns.

Ensure a level of police protection, fire protection, and emergency services that

Goal 10:

Promote quality schools and access to educational opportunities.

Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Goals

Agricultural Resources

Goals 1:

agricultural resources for current and future generations.

Maintain the viability, operational efficiency, and productivity of the town’s

Goal 2:

Balance the protection of farmland with the exercise of development rights.

Goal 3:

town.

Promote agricultural development as an economic development resource in the

Natural Resources

Goal 1:

Encourage the efficient management of the Town’s natural resources.

Goal 2:

Protect and improve the quality of the town’s ground and surface water.

Goal 3:

Preserve the natural and scenic qualities of lakes and shorelines in the town.

Goal 4:

wetlands, woodlands, wildlife habitat, and water quality.

Balance future development with the protection of natural resources including

Goal 5:

Protect air quality.

Goal 6:

aesthetic, and environmental values.

Preserve and protect woodlands and forest resources for their economic,

Cultural Resources

Goal 1:

landscapes, undeveloped lands, forest, water resources, wildlife, farms, rural and small

town atmosphere, buildings integrated with the landscape, and enjoyment of these

surroundings.

Preserve the Northwood’s character as defined by scenic beauty, a variety of

Goal 2:

community identity and character within reason.

Preserve historic and cultural lands, sites and structures that contribute to

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Goal 3:

activities and facilities and additional job opportunities.

Strengthen opportunities for youth in the town including youth-oriented

Economic Development Goals

Goal 1:

on rural lands and provide opportunity for compatible economic growth and

development.

Maintain and enhance opportunities for agricultural based industries dependent

Goal 2:

the employment and personal income base of the Town.

Attract, retain, and expand quality businesses and industries that will improve

Goal 3:

facilities and transportation services that are cost effective and environmentally

compatible.

Help provide sufficient commercial and industrial land adjacent to public

Goal 4:

town and region.

Support the organizational growth of economic development programs in the

Goals 5:

that promote economic development.

Maintain the utility, communication, and transportation, infrastructure systems

Goals 6:

high standard of living.

Maintain a quality workforce to strengthen existing businesses and maintain a

Intergovernmental Cooperation Goals

Goal 1:

the town and other units of government, and the county.

Foster the growth of mutually beneficial intergovernmental relations between

Land Use Goals

Goal 1:

recognition of resource limitations and town goals and objectives.

Guide the efficient use of land through a unified vision of planned growth in

Goal 2:

town’s goals and objectives for the future.

Plan for a desirable pattern of land use that contributes to the realization of the

Implementation Goals

Goal 1:

recommendations with the ordinances and implementation tools that affect the town.

Promote consistent integration of the comprehensive plan policies and

Goal 2:

community interests and goals.

Balance appropriate land use regulations and individual property rights with

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1.4 Comprehensive Plan Development Process and Public

Participation

The Wisconsin Comprehensive Planning legislation specifies that the governing body for a unit

of government must prepare and adopt written procedures to foster public participation in the

comprehensive planning process. This includes open discussion, communication programs,

information services, and public meetings for which advance notice has been provided, in every

stage of the preparation of a comprehensive plan. Public participation includes wide distribution

of proposed drafts, plan alternatives, and proposed amendments of the comprehensive plan.

Public participation includes opportunities for members of the public to send written comments

on the plan to the applicable governing body, and a process for the governing body to respond.

The Town of Wood River has adopted a

comply with the requirements of Section 66.1001(4)(a) of the Wisconsin Statutes. The town's

adopted

The Burnett County comprehensive planning process was designed to encourage extensive

grassroots, citizen-based input. Not only were public outreach tools and events utilized, but

citizens were directly involved in writing their own local comprehensive plans, as well as the

county comprehensive plan. Please refer to Sections 1.3 through 1.5 of the

Inventory and Trends Report

processes.

In addition to the public participation process described in the

Trends Report

Public Participation and Education Plan in order toPublic Participation and Education Plan is found in Appendix B.Burnett Countyfor further details on the plan development and public participationBurnett County Inventory and, the process of adopting the Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

included several public participation activities. These include Wood River public informational

meetings, Planning Committee, Plan Commission, and Town Board action, a public hearing, and

the distribution of recommended and final plan documents.

Public Informational Meetings

In accordance with the County planning process, Wood River used Plan Commission meetings,

cluster meetings, and public informational meetings as part of the planning process. Wood River

participated in six integrated cluster meetings at the county level, and held several local plan

commission meetings as part plan development. Each participating community worked through a

‘base package’ process of meetings and local work sessions as facilitated by Foth and Burnett

County. The cluster planning process provided the framework to enable each community to

work through the planning process and hit key plan development benchmarks while allowing

enough schedule flexibility to facilitate local, issue specific meetings.

The county also held periodic public informational meetings as part of the integrated meeting

process to allow for efficient communication to the general public and ensure access to

information as key points during plan development. Each public informational meeting included

both county and local information and was attended by both local and county officials. Please

refer to the Issues and Opportunities chapter of the Burnett County Inventory and Trends Report

for more detail.

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Plan Commission and Town Board Action

On ________, the Town of Wood River Plan Commission discussed the draft comprehensive

plan and passed resolution number ________ recommending approval of the plan to the Town

Board. After completion of the public hearing, the Town of Wood River Town Board discussed

and adopted the comprehensive plan by passing ordinance number ________ on __________.

Public Hearing

On _________, a public hearing was held on the recommended

Comprehensive Plan

comments were accepted for 30 days prior to the hearing. Verbal and written comments were

taken into consideration by the Town Board before taking action to adopt the plan.

Town of Wood River Year 2030at the town hall. The hearing was preceded by Class 1 notice and public

Distribution of Plan Documents

Both the recommended draft and final plan documents were provided to adjacent and

overlapping units of government, the local library, and the Wisconsin Department of

Administration in accordance with the

Appendix B.

Public Participation and Education Plan found in

1.5 Town of Wood River Issues and Opportunities

The initial direction for the comprehensive planning process was set by identifying community

issues and opportunities. Issues were defined as challenges, conflicts, or problems that a

community is currently facing or is likely to face in the future. Opportunities were defined as the

positive aspects of a community that residents are proud of and value about their community.

These could either be current positive aspects of a community, or have the potential to be created

in the future.

In the first round of cluster meetings held December 15-16, 2008, the Town of Wood River

Planning Commission Members and community representatives reviewed a base set of issues

and opportunities developed by the County Planning Committee. These issues and opportunities

were then revised by the participants to reflect the Town’s unique conditions. After the full list

was developed, each participant voted on the statements to establish a sense of priority. The

following issues and opportunities were identified:

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Table 1-1

Issues and Opportunities Identification

Town of Wood River

Issues Identified by the Town of Wood River Votes

Economic development should include agricultural lands, farming and farmland. 17

Local land use regulation. 13

Maintain the Town of Wood River's Northwoods Character/Quality of Life

The perception is this is currently being threatened by increasing development,

population, tourism and poor development practices. The General character of the

County is being affected by unsightly development and land use conflicts. A

widespread perception that existing land use controls and guidance have not kept

pace with the changing conditions. The issue needs to be defined and then develop

strategies to protect that definition.

11

Lakefront Water Issues

Demand for lake front property and lake access has caused increased development

pressure on lakes in the County. Many lakes are threatened with overcrowding and

the problems associated with overuse such as public recreation conflicts, surface

water use conflicts, adverse impacts to sensitive riparian, and littoral habitats.

(Could be a sub-set of Natural Resource issues.)

8

Unwanted cluster housing/housing development is an issue. 8

Preservation of farmland, giving farmers tools to stay in business. 7

Intergovernmental cooperation, road, fire department, state, county. 3

Natural Resources

Preservation and enhancement to spur economic growth while maintaining

Northwood’s character. The perception is that access to public lands, Recreation,

wildlife is being threatened. Furthermore, there is concern over loss of woods,

“green spaces”, and how sensitive areas such as lakes are becoming overdeveloped.

3

Youth Issues

Brain drain, Creating opportunities for youth that will keep them in the Town of

Wood River; lack of opportunities for youth (maybe causing brain-drain), lack of

funding for schools, declining enrollments, lack of state funding, etc.

2

Demographic Shifts and Its Impacts

Loss of youth increase of elderly. We are loosing young people who need work,

while simultaneously gaining older people who need services. Need a strategy to

keep young people here, attract high tech individuals to area and tap into their skills.

2

Elderly Issues

Retirement and turnover (staff and Board), increasing demand for government

services

2

Technology Issues

County has good technology infrastructure; leverage technology – wireless, DSL,

fiber optics, internet (could be a sub-set of communication).

2

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1-10 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Issues Identified by the Town of Wood River Votes

How to Pay for Them

Ability to leverage grants to off-set local taxes and tap into state and federal

programs, room tax, highway, fees, develop new fee for services.

1

Communication Improvements

County and towns and tribes.

1.6 Issues and Opportunities Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Policies and Recommendations

IO 1. The Town shall conduct business related to land use decision-making by utilizing an

open public process and by considering its Comprehensive Plan.

IO 2. Public participation shall continue to be encouraged for all aspects of Town

governance.

IO 3. Sustainable business practices should be considered and implemented where possible

(being ‘sustainable’ defined as containing as a viable unit of government focused on

the demographic, natural resource, economic, and fiscal sustainability).

IO 4. Innovative planning and related land use initiatives or ideas will be given full

consideration while in Town development review.

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2. Population and Housing

2.1 Population and Housing Plan

Population and housing are two key indicators that will help the Town of Wood River plan ahead

for future growth and change. Because they are key indicators of potential future conditions, this

element of the comprehensive plan provides a brief summary of population and housing data

along with projections for the future. For further detail on population and housing in the Town

of Wood River and Burnett County, please refer to Chapter 2 of the

Report

The Town of Wood River’s plan for population and housing reflects its diverse landscape which

includes aspects of both rural and shoreline-oriented population and housing characteristics.

Regardless of which landscape applies, the town’s primary concern is to retain rural character as

population and housing growth continue into the future. Due to its rural nature, the town

anticipates that single family, owner-occupied homes will continue to dominate the housing

stock. However, as the aging segment of the population grows, it is expected that demand for

elder care facilities, mixed use development, multi-family structures, and other forms of housing

will increase. The relative accessibility of medical services and urban amenities coupled with

the town’s rural character and natural amenities will continue to make Wood River an attractive

location for a variety of housing types.

The town’s plan for population and housing is focused on protecting agriculture and forestry,

preserving natural resources and rural character, and promoting housing affordability as housing

growth takes place. Top issues and opportunities identified during the planning process (refer to

Inventory and Trends.

Issues and Opportunities

agriculture and rural housing development, the amount of land required to build a house, and the

lack of affordable housing. Therefore, opportunities for future housing growth will be provided

by protecting the town’s best agricultural and forest lands from high density development while

allowing more development to take place in other areas of the town. Preventing land use

conflicts between intensive agriculture operations and housing development is a primary

concern. These issues are addressed in detail by other elements of this plan, and key

implementation tools include the management of development density, the use of conservation

land division design, and the use of site planning guidelines.

element) related to housing include potential conflicts between

2.2 Population Characteristics Summary

2000 Census

A significant amount of information, particularly with regard to population, housing, and

economic development, was obtained from the U.S. Bureau of the Census. There are two

methodologies for data collection employed by the Census, STF-1 (short form) and STF-3 (long

form). STF-1 data were collected through a household by household census and represent

responses from every household in the country. To get more detailed information, the U.S.

Census Bureau also randomly distributes a long form questionnaire to one in six households

throughout the nation. Tables that use these sample data are indicated as STF-3 data. It should

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2-2 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

be noted that STF-1 and STF-3 data may differ for similar statistics, due to survey limitations,

non-response, or other attributes unique to each form of data collection.

It should also be noted that some STF-3 based statistics represent estimates for a given

population, and statistical estimation errors may be readily apparent in data for smaller

populations. For example, the total number of housing units will be identical for both STF-1

statistics and STF-3 statistics when looking at the county as a whole – a larger population.

However, the total number of housing units may be slightly different between STF-1 statistics

and STF-3 statistics when looking at a single community within Burnett County – a smaller

population.

Population Counts

Population counts provide information both for examining historic change and for anticipating

future community trends. Figure 2-1 displays the population counts of the Town of Wood River

for 1970 through 2000 according to the U.S. Census.

Figure 2-1

Population, Town of Wood River, 1970-2008

876 883

948

974

1,032

750

800

850

900

950

1,000

1,050

1970 1980 1990 2000 2008

Year

Population

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1970-2008 and Wisconsin Department of Administration.

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As displayed by Figure 2-1, the Town of Wood River has grown steadily over the 38 year period.

Approximately 156 people were added to the population representing an increase of 18% from

1970 to 2008. Within the past eight years, the population in the Town of Wood River has

increased by 6.0%, which is fairly average compared to other communities in the county. As of

2007, the town ranked in the upper quartile in terms of population when compared to all the

other towns in Burnett County.

Table 2-1 displays the population trends of Burnett County, its municipalities, and the State of

Wisconsin from 1970 to 2000 according to the U.S. Census.

Table 2-1

Population Counts, Burnett County, 1970-2007

1970 1980 1990 2000 2008

% Change 1970 -

1980

% Change

1980 - 1990

% Change

1990 - 2000

% Change

2000-2008

T. Anderson 193 265 324 372 402 37.3% 22.3% 14.8% 8.1%

T. Blaine 129 151 172 224 229 17.1% 13.9% 30.2% 2.2%

T. Daniels 532 607 602 665 713 14.1% -0.8% 10.5% 7.2%

T. Dewey 419 520 482 565 605 24.1% -7.3% 17.2% 7.1%

T. Grantsburg 501 677 860 967 1,139 35.1% 27.0% 12.4% 17.8%

T. Jackson 128 331 457 765 860 158.6% 38.1% 67.4% 12.4%

T. La Follette 269 388 416 511 517 44.2% 7.2% 22.8% 1.2%

T. Lincoln 119 215 228 286 310 80.7% 6.0% 25.4% 8.4%

T. Meenon 596 838 956 1,172 1,257 40.6% 14.1% 22.6% 7.3%

T. Oakland 311 486 480 778 895 56.3% -1.2% 62.1% 15.0%

T. Roosevelt 177 178 175 197 204 0.6% -1.7% 12.6% 3.6%

T. Rusk 211 349 396 420 405 65.4% 13.5% 6.1% -3.6%

T. Sand Lake 306 422 439 556 567 37.9% 4.0% 26.7% 2.0%

T. Scott 252 409 419 590 648 62.3% 2.4% 40.8% 9.8%

T. Siren 550 887 910 873 920 61.3% 2.6% -4.1% 5.4%

T. Swiss 518 587 645 815 871 13.3% 9.9% 26.4% 6.9%

T. Trade Lake 673 824 831 871 970 22.4% 0.8% 4.8% 11.4%

T. Union 147 199 221 351 346 35.4% 11.1% 58.8% -1.4%

T. Webb Lake 125 256 200 381 421 104.8% -21.9% 90.5% 10.5%

T. West Marshland 173 209 293 331 388 20.8% 40.2% 13.0% 17.2%

T. Wood River 876 883 948 974 1,032 0.8% 7.4% 2.7% 6.0%

V. Grantsburg 930 1,153 1,144 1,369 1,460 24.0% -0.8% 19.7% 6.6%

V. Siren 639 896 863 988 947 40.2% -3.7% 14.5% -4.1%

V. Webster 502 610 623 653 685 21.5% 2.1% 4.8% 4.9%

Burnett County 9,276 12,340 13,084 15,674 16,791 33.0% 6.0% 19.8% 7.1%

Wisconsin 4,417,731 4,705,642 4,891,769 5,363,675 5,675,156 6.5% 4.0% 9.5% 5.8%

Sou

rce: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1970-2000, STF-1.

Population Forecasts

Population forecasts are based on past and current population trends. They are not predictions,

but rather they extend past trends into the future, and their reliability depends on the continuation

of these trends. Projections are therefore most accurate in periods of relative socio-economic

and cultural stability. Projections should be considered as one of many tools used to help

anticipate future needs in the Town of Wood River.

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Two sources have been utilized to provide population projections. The first projection is from

the Wisconsin Department of Administration (which is the official state projection through

2035). The second projection is a linear trend based on census data going back to 1970. Figure

2-2 displays the two population projections created for the Town of Wood River.

Figure 2-2

Comparative Population Forecast, 2000-2030

Town of Wood River Population Forecasts

Source: Wisconsin Department of Administration, Demographic Services Center, Final Population Projections

for Wisconsin Municipalities: 2000-2030, May 2008. Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC linear projections

2005-2030.

The two available projections vary widely and forecast a range of population growth from 55 to

90 additional persons between 2008 and 2030. The actual growth scenario is likely to be

somewhere in between the two projections. The rate of growth has slowed in recent years, and

economic trends support continued slowing of local population growth. On the other hand, the

features of the Town of Wood River that attract people to the area will continue to make this a

growing part of Burnett County. For the purpose of forecasting future land use demand (refer to

the

to 13% growth or an average of about 4 new people per year over the 30 year period.

Land Use element), the WDOA population projection was selected. This projection equates

850

900

950

1,000

1,050

1,100

1,150

Census

DOA

Linear

Census 974

DOA 1,032 1,032 1,046 1,066 1,084 1,091 1,087

Linear 1,032 1,040 1,061 1,081 1,102 1,122

Census

2000

2005

Estimate

2008

Estimate

2010

Projection

2015

Projection

2020

Projection

2025

Projection

2030

Projection

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2.3 Housing Characteristics Summary

Housing Supply, Occupancy, and Tenure

Tables 2-2 and 2-3 display the occupancy and tenure characteristics of housing units for Burnett

County and the Town of Wood River in 1990 and 2000.

Table 2-2

Housing Supply, Occupancy, and Tenure, Town of Wood River,

1990 and 2000

1990

Percent of

Total 2000

Percent of

Total

# Change

1990 - 2000

% Change

1990 - 2000

Total housing units

Occupied housing units

Owner-occupied

Renter-occupied

Vacant housing units

Seasonal units

550 100.0% 730 100.0% 180 32.7%104 18.9% 186 25.5% 82 78.8%274 49.8% 183 98.4% -91 -33.2%76 73.1% 3 1.6% -73 -96.1%446 81.1% 544 74.5% 98 22.0%183 41.0% 532 97.8% 349 190.7%

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000.

Table 2-3

Housing Supply, Occupancy, and Tenure, Burnett County,

1990 and 2000

1990

Percent of

Total 2000

Percent of

Total

# Change

1990 - 2000

% Change

1990 - 2000

Total housing units

Occupied housing units

Owner-occupied

Renter-occupied

Vacant housing units

Seasonal units

11,743 100.0% 12,582 100.0% 839 7.1%5,242 44.6% 6,613 52.6% 1,371 26.2%4,232 36.0% 5,587 44.4% 1,355 32.0%1,010 8.6% 1,026 8.2% 16 1.6%6,501 55.4% 5,969 47.4% -532 -8.2%5,870 90.3% 5,664 94.9% -206 -3.5%

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-1, 1990-2000

.

The housing supply in the Town of Wood River consists of a variety of housing types in terms of

occupancy and tenure. Approximately 25% of homes in Wood River are owner occupied.

While the data show a large percentage of vacant housing, nearly all of these housing units are

seasonal residences. Compared to Burnett County as a whole, there are much larger proportions

of renter-occupied and seasonal housing. These data suggest that the housing supply in Wood

River is less difficult to access in terms of rental units and vacant unit availability and sales. The

presence of seasonal units as a considerable piece of the housing supply is a reflection of the

importance of tourism in the county.

Between 1990 and 2000, the town experienced trends similar to those of the county as a whole.

Owner-occupied units grew at a faster rate in the town, and renter-occupied units declined at a

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2-6 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

faster rate than the county as a whole. The Town of Wood River was strongly impacted by the

recent trend to convert many seasonal units to year round homes.

Housing Units in Structure

Figure 2-3 displays the breakdown of housing units by type of structure (“units in structure”) for

the Town of Wood River on a percentage basis for 2000.

Figure 2-3

Units in Structure, Town of Wood River, 2000

Singlefamily,

detached

86.2%

3 or 4 units

0.7%

2 units

1.1%

Single-family

attached

1.3%

5 to 9 units

0.4%

Mobile home

10.4%

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000, STF-3.

One-unit, detached structures dominate the housing supply at about 86.2%, mobile homes make

up 10.4%, and multiple unit structures make up a total of 2.2%. These data show that the

housing supply in the Town of Wood River is fairly homogenous; however, the variety of

multiple unit homes also displays a fair amount of diversity for an unincorporated town.

Housing Forecasts

Similar to population forecasts, housing projections are based on past and current housing trends.

They are not predictions, but rather they extend past trends into the future, and their reliability

depends on the continuation of these trends. Projections are therefore most accurate in periods of

relative socio-economic and cultural stability. Projections should be considered as one of many

tools used to help anticipate future needs in the town.

Figure 2-4 shows Year 2030 housing projections that range from an increase of 31 housing units

to an increase of 51 housing units from 2008 to 2030. The more conservative projection was

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based on WisDOA population projections, which take into account demographic and migration

trends, while the higher projection was based on historical trends from the U.S. Census. The

actual growth scenario is likely to be between these two projections. This equates to an average

of between about 2 to 3 new homes per year over the 22 year period. The projected new housing

unit growth is not an indication that all new structures will be constructed, as there could be

housing units created from modifying existing single family residences etc. Within the last 10

years, the town has issued as many as 4 building permits per year for new construction, which is

reflected in the highest level of projected growth. However, growth has slowed in recent years,

and this trend is not expected to continue. The rate of future housing growth is likely to equate

to about 41 new homes by 2030.

Figure 2-4

Comparative Housing Forecast, 2000-2030

500

520

540

560

580

600

620

640

Census 2000

WisDOA

Projection

Linear

Projection

Census 2000 546

WisDOA Projection 579 587 599 609 613 610

Linear Projection 584 596 607 619 630

Census

2000

2008

Estimate

2010 2015 2020 2025 2030

Source: Applied Population Laboratory, UW-Madison/Extension, 2004. U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000, STF-

1. Linear Trend Projection, 2005-2030. Burnett County Zoning Department.

2.4 Population and Housing Trends and Outlook

Of the population and housing trends identified for Burnett County and the State of Wisconsin

(refer to Section 2.4 of the

experienced in the Town of Wood River over the next 20 to 25 years.

Inventory and Trends Report), the following are likely to be

significant portion of the total population by 2030.

The aging population is growing, and people over 65 are projected to comprise a

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2-8 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Minority populations are expected to increase.

Expect the continued conversion of seasonal to permanent structures.

Condominiums will increase as an option for seniors and first time home buyers.

affordable housing.

Interest in modular and mobile home development will continue as driven by need for

farmland, woodland and open areas to subdivisions and lots will increase, especially in

rapidly growing areas.

People will continue to desire an “acre or two in the country,” and pressure to convert

The need for elderly housing will increase as the population ages.

options like assisted living, condominiums, and the like.

Vacant housing units may increase as a result from the aging population choosing other

Finding quality, affordable housing will become increasingly difficult.

High demand for housing and energy cost assistance will continue.

2.5 Housing for All Income Levels

The housing stock in rural Wisconsin communities typically has a high proportion of singlefamily

homes, with few other housing types available. While a range of housing costs can be

found in single-family homes, larger communities are generally relied upon to provide a greater

variety of housing types and a larger range of costs. It is a benefit to a community to have a

housing stock that matches the ability of residents to afford the associated costs. This is the

fundamental issue when determining housing affordability and the ability to provide a variety of

housing types for various income levels.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines housing affordability by

comparing income levels to housing costs. According to HUD, housing is affordable when it

costs no more than 30% of total household income. For renters, HUD defined housing costs

include utilities paid by the tenant.

According to the U.S. Census, housing in the Town of Wood River appears to be affordable on

the average. The median household income in the town in 1999 was $40,476 per year, or $3,373

per month. The median monthly owner cost for a mortgaged housing unit in the town was $863,

and the median monthly gross rent in the town was $429. The term “gross rent” includes the

average estimated monthly cost of utilities paid by the renter. According to the HUD definition

of affordable housing, the average home owner in the Town of Wood River spends about 25.6%

of household income on housing costs, and therefore has affordable housing. The average renter

in the Town of Wood River spends about 12.7% of household income on housing costs, and

therefore has affordable housing. It should be noted, however, that this does not rule out

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individual cases where households do not have affordable housing. In fact, in 1999, 15.3% of

homeowners and 34.6% of renters in the Town of Wood River paid 30% or more of their

household income on housing costs.

2.6 Housing for All Age Groups and Persons with Special Needs

As the general population ages, affordability, security, accessibility, proximity to services,

transportation, and medical facilities will all become increasingly important. Regardless of age,

many of these issues are also important to those with disabilities or other special needs. As new

residents move into the area and the population ages, other types of housing must be considered

to meet all resident needs. This is particularly true in communities where a large proportion of

the population includes long-time residents with a desire to remain in the area during their

retirement years.

The Wisconsin Department of Administration has projected that a significant shift in Burnett

County’s age structure will take place by 2035. More than 7,100 Burnett County residents are

expected to be age 65 and older by that time, growing from 21% of the 2005 estimated

population to 38% of the projected 2030 population. As this shift in the age structure takes

place, communities may find it necessary to further assess the availability of housing for all age

groups and persons with special needs.

2.7 Promoting Availability of Land for Development/Redevelopment of

Low-Income and Moderate-Income Housing

Promoting the availability of underdeveloped or underused land is one way to meet the needs of

low- and moderate-income individuals. One way to accomplish this is to plan for an adequate

supply of land that will be zoned for housing at higher densities or for multi-family housing.

Another option is to adopt housing policies requiring that a proportion of units in new housing

developments or lots in new subdivisions meet a standard for affordability. Two elements of

comprehensive planning are important in this equation. In the Housing element, a community

can set its goals, objectives, and policies for affordable housing. In the Land Use element, a

community can identify potential development and redevelopment areas.

Wood River has an adequate supply of land planned for Rural Residential (RR) development

which envisions greater densities than the Agriculture (A) land use management area (See

Section 8.8).

2.8 Maintaining and Rehabilitating the Existing Housing Stock

The maintenance and rehabilitation of the existing housing stock within the community is one of

the most effective ways to ensure safe and generally affordable housing without sacrificing land

to new development. To manage housing stock maintenance and rehabilitation, a community

can monitor characteristics including, price, aesthetics, safety, cleanliness, and overall suitability

with community character. The goal of ongoing monitoring is to preserve the quality of the

current housing supply with the hope of reducing the need for new development, which has far

greater impacts on community resources.

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2.9 Population and Housing Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1:

the current and future residents to have access to a full range of housing choices for all

income levels, age groups and special needs for those who wish to reside in a rural

atmosphere.

Objectives:

Facilitate opportunities for an adequate housing program that will meet the needs of

A. Encourage development & high density development into villages.

B. Encourage the surrounding communities to work with Wood River in placing

household with special needs in areas that make economic and common sense.

C. Ensure that town residents have equal access (antidiscrimination) to housing.

D. Encourage innovative housing design for energy and eco friendly housing.

E. Encourage a balance that provides a balance of low-income, moderate-income, and

high-income housing.

F. Coordinate with the county to plan for the aging population’s housing needs.

G. Direct the development of large residential subdivisions to planned growth areas in

order to prevent conflicts between residential development and productive land uses

like agriculture and forestry.

H. Encourage the use of creative development designs that preserve rural character,

agricultural land, productive forests, and natural resources.

I. Prohibit mobile home parks and establish rules for placement of mobile home.

Goal 2:

fashion that does not impact scarce natural resources or agricultural lands.

Objectives:

To guide new housing development into areas that can be efficiently served in a

A. Support opportunities for multi-family, group housing. And other high-density

residential development in existing neighborhoods with established sewer and water

services within Burnett County’s villages.

B. Direct residential development to villages.

Goal 3:

housing stock.

Objectives:

When reasonable support the maintenance and rehabilitation of the town’s existing

A. Work with the county to help provide assistance in maintenance and rehabilitation

of housing for town residents.

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B. Enforce zoning and nuisance abatement code requirements on blighted residential

properties.

C. Encourage the preservation, maintenance, and rehabilitation of historically

significant homes.

2.10 Population and Housing Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

H 1. New housing should be low-density development and located in a manner that

preserves the rural character of the town.

H 2. Siting and construction of new housing shall be consistent with the purpose,

intent, and preferred density established in the applicable Land Use Management

Areas and meet the applicable review criteria established by other planning

element polices.

H 3. The Town should consider allowing for flexible site design (e.g. lot size) and

allow clustering of building sites provided proposals are consistent with other

provisions of the comprehensive plan.

H 4. Siting new development within rural areas should be complimentary to the

landscape with the intent to reduce impacts to natural vegetation, preserve quality

farmland, and reduce woodland fragmentation.

H 5. Encourage high-density development into Villages.

H 6. As the aging segment of the population grows, the Town should evaluate its

preparedness for meeting the related changes in housing needs.

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H 7. Manufactured dwellings should feature designs similar to “stick-built” homes.

H 8. Consideration should be made in decisions regarding impacts to affordable

housing, lot size regulations and local land use.

H 9. Housing ordinances, polices, standards and ideals shall be made available to new

homeowners to ensure their knowledge of local housing regulations.

H 10. An inventory of historically significant homes should be maintained throughout

the planning period to ensure that these homes are accurately identified and to

promote and target preservation and/or rehabilitation efforts if warranted.

2.11 Population and Housing Programs

For descriptions of housing programs potentially available to the community, refer to the

Population and Housing

element of the Burnett County Inventory and Trends Report.

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3. Transportation

3.1 Transportation Plan

The land use patterns of the Town of Wood River, Burnett County, and the surrounding region

are tied together by the transportation system, including roadways and trails. Households,

businesses, farms, industries, schools, government, and many others all rely on a dependable

transportation system to function and to provide linkages to areas beyond their immediate

locations. The Town of Wood River’s transportation network plays a major role in the

efficiency, safety, and overall desirability of the area as a place to live and work. For further

detail on transportation in the Town of Wood River and Burnett County, please refer to Chapter

3 of the

With the amount of population and housing growth that is expected over the next 20 years, the

Town of Wood River should also anticipate change to its transportation system. The town’s plan

for transportation is to be prepared for potential development proposals, to ensure that future

expansion of the town’s road system is cost-effective, to preserve the mobility and connectivity

of local roads, to improve opportunities for pedestrian and bicycle routes, and to ensure that

developed properties have safe emergency vehicle access. In order to achieve this, the town

utilizes a driveway ordinance. The Town should also coordinate with the county to review all

land divisions for access and layout considerations, plan for road improvements, and continue to

maintain a set of town road construction specifications. The policies and recommendations of

this plan provide guidance on how these tools should be used.

As the town implements its plan, a key dilemma will be balancing the rural character and

mobility of existing roads with the maximum use of existing road infrastructure. On one hand,

existing roads are already present, new roads are costly, and new development can be more cost

effective if it utilizes existing roads. On the other hand, extensive placement of new

development in highly visible locations along existing roads will forever change the character

and appearance of the town. This may lead to a loss of rural character. Adding access points to

serve new development also reduces the mobility of a road. This plan includes a policy that

directs new development to utilize the existing road network to the maximum extent possible.

However, this plan also encourages new subdivisions to utilize conservation design which will

usually require the construction of new roads, but does a better job of preserving rural character.

In order to balance these competing interests, the town will require the coordinated planning of

adjacent development sites by limiting the use of cul-de-sacs and by reviewing Area

Development Plans. Over the long term, the town may also develop an official map to preserve

planned rights-of-way and connections between developed areas. The town should require that

potential traffic and road damage impacts are assessed by developers as part of the development

application.

Inventory and Trends Report.

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3.2 Planned Transportation Improvements

It is a recommendation of this plan that a five-year road improvement plan be annually updated

in the future. Future road improvement plans should attempt to provide integration with the plan

for preferred land use. Areas planned for higher density residential growth should receive

priority for improvements in order to support such growth. Road improvements that are

necessary in areas where agriculture, forestry, and outdoor recreational are planned as primary

uses should be accompanied by zoning regulations, access controls, and other growth

management tools.

3.3 Comparison with County, State, and Regional Transportation

Plans

State, regional, and county transportation plans have been reviewed for their applicability to the

Town of Wood River by the Town Board.

The Town of Wood River has the following recommendations with regard to the current

functional classification of highways in the town. Several roads currently classified as local

roads should be considered as potential collectors due to increased traffic, growth and

development, and connections provided between other major routes or important destinations.

Williams Road

Cross Town Road

Rangeline Road

Townline Road

3.4 Transportation Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1

development pattern and meet anticipated transportation demand generated by existing and

planned land uses.

Objectives:

: Provide for a safe, efficient, and environmentally sound transportation system which,

A. Protect historic, scenic, scientific, and cultural sites when constructing new or improving

existing transportation facilities.

B. Minimize the disruption of environmentally sensitive areas when constructing new or

improving existing transportation facilities.

C. Design transportation facilities to be aesthetically pleasing and sensitive to the landscape,

including such amenities as buffers in urban areas and minimizing unsightly views such

as junkyards, billboards, and strip commercial development in rural areas.

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D. Manage right-of-way vegetation to protect wildlife, appropriate use of herbicides, reduce

maintenance costs, and improve safety.

E. Locate transportation facilities to minimize exposure of people to harmful or annoying

air, water, or noise pollution levels.

F. Reduce accident exposure by improving deficient roadways.

G. Manage driveway access location and design to ensure traffic safety, provide adequate

emergency vehicle access, and prevent damage to roadways and ditches.

H. Require developers to bear the costs for the improvement or construction of roads needed

to serve new development.

I. Guide new growth to existing road systems so that new development does not financially

burden the town or make inefficient use of tax dollars.

J. Monitor the effectiveness of existing, and opportunities for new, shared service

agreements for providing town and local road maintenance.

K. Maintain the availability of roads for agricultural use.

Goal 2:

Objectives:

Provide safe and efficient multi-modal transportation systems where appropriate.

A. Maintain and implement road way improvement plans.

B. Support alternative transportation choices in the town through a greater number of routes

and connections to other transportation systems and destinations.

C. Encourage the monitoring of transit needs, particularly for senior residents.

Goal 3:

developing the Town transportation system.

Objectives:

Promote cooperation and coordination between state, county, villages, and towns in

A. Encourage communication between communities regarding transportation projects that

cross municipal boundaries.

B. Promote a coordinated transportation system consisting of trails, roads, and highway,

Participate in transportation planning at the regional level with Northwest Wisconsin

Regional Planning Commission, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, and

Burnett County Highway Department.

C. Communicate with community groups on transportation systems to assist communities in

prioritization and funding of projects.

D. Direct future residential, commercial, and industrial development to roadways capable of

accommodating resulting traffic.

E. Direct truck traffic to appropriate routes and plan cooperatively with neighboring

communities.

3.5 Transportation Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

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3-4 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

T 1. Roads that provide access to multiple improved properties shall be built to town

standards as a condition of approval for new development.

T 2. A five-year road improvement plan shall be maintained and annually updated to

identify and prioritize road improvement projects as well as identify potential funding

sources.

T 3. The PASER (Pavement Service and Evaluation Rating System) shall be utilized to

annually update the 5-year Road improvement Program.

T 4. The existing road network and public facilities and services will be utilized to

accommodate new development to the maximum extent possible.

T 5. Developers shall bear an equitable share of the costs for improvements and extensions

to the transportation network.

T 6. The Town should consider opportunities to create or improve alternative

transportation options in concert with the review of proposed developments and

planning for road improvements or public facilities.

T 7. Adopt town road construction specifications to include modern requirements for road

base, surfacing, and drainage construction as well as options for pedestrian and

bicycle features. Construction specifications should be adjustable based on the

planned functional classification or expected traffic flow of a roadway.

T 8. Where applicable, update town road construction specifications to include alternative

options (Example: pedestrian and bicycle features).

T 9. Adopt a town road Access Control (driveway) Ordinance (based on a county-wide

model to assist towns with implementing access control and emergency vehicle

access standards.

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T 10. The development of new or improved access points to local roads should meet town

standards found in the Driveway Ordinance.

T 11. Support the modification the county land division ordinance to support local

requirements for the execution of a development agreement whenever public roads or

other infrastructure is included in a development.

T 12. In areas surrounding incorporated communities, development should be coordinated

with the adjacent community to the extent possible through an Area Development

Plan that assess the potential for connecting planned subdivision roads with future

development on surrounding properties.

T 13. Actively pursue available funding, especially federal and state sources, for needed

transportation facilities. Funding for multimode facilities should be emphasized

where appropriate.

T 14. Proper ditch location; grading practices and shape will be pursued to ensure runoff is

adequately given an outlet.

T 15. Residential subdivisions and non-residential development proposals will be designed

to include:

a. A safe and efficient system of internal circulation for vehicles and pedestrians;

b. Trails or sidewalks where applicable;

c. Bicycle routes where appropriate;

d. Safe and efficient external collector roads where appropriate;

e. Safe and efficient connections to arterial roads and highways where applicable;

f. Connectivity of the road network with adjacent developments (where practical

and desirable).

g. Cul-de-sacs or dead-ends, only where connections to other roads are not possible,

or temporarily where the right-of-way has been developed to the edge of the

property for future connection to adjacent development.

T 16. Working with the county, develop a consistent approach for the posting of seasonal

and permanent weight limits, especially with respect to the conduct of agricultural

and forestry operations.

T 17. Where road weight limits are posted, access to agricultural and forestlands should be

allowed for the conduct of all normal and necessary farming and forestry operations.

This can be achieved through the use of Class B weight limits or through the issuance

of exemption permits. Note: No vehicle is automatically exempt from posted weight

limits. Exemptions only occur through the issuance of exemption permits or through

the use of Class B weight limits.

T 18. Transportation related issues that have effects in neighboring areas, should be jointly

discussed and evaluated with that neighbor, the county, and the Wisconsin

Department of Transportation if necessary.

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3.6 Transportation Programs

For descriptions of transportation programs potentially available to the community, refer to the

Transportation

programs shown here are of high importance to the Town of Wood River and should be

monitored for their applicability to local transportation issues and opportunities.

element of the Burnett County Inventory and Trends Report. The additional

Additional Programs

Local Roads Improvement Program

Established in 1991, the Local Roads Improvement Program (LRIP) assists local governments in

improving seriously deteriorating county highways, town roads, and Village and village streets.

A reimbursement program, LRIP pays up to 50% of total eligible costs with local governments

providing the balance. In order to be eligible for LRIP funds, a unit of government must have a

current road improvement plan.

Local Bridge Improvement Assistance Program

The Local Bridge Improvement Assistance program helps rehabilitate and replace, on a costshared

basis, the most seriously deficient existing local bridges on Wisconsin's local highway

systems. Counties, villages, villages, and towns are eligible for rehabilitation funding on bridges

with sufficiency ratings less than 80, and replacement funding on bridges with sufficiency ratings

less than 50.

Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating (PASER)

PASER is a simple method of rating asphalt and concrete roads on a scale of 1 to 10 and gravel

roads on a scale of 1 to 5, based on visual inspection. PASER manuals and a video explain how

and why roads deteriorate, and describe proper repair and replacement techniques. PASER

rating can be put into PASERWARE, an easy to use pavement management software package.

PASERWARE helps to inventory roads and keep track of their PASER ratings and maintenance

histories. It also helps to prioritize road maintenance and improvement needs, calculate project

costs, evaluate the consequences of alternative budgets and project selection strategies, and

communicate those consequences to the public and local officials. Both PASER and

PASERWARE are available from the University of Wisconsin’s Transportation Information

Center at no charge. The Center also offers free training courses. Call (800) 442-4615 for more

information.

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4. Utilities and Community Facilities

4.1 Utilities and Community Facilities Plan

Efficient provision of high quality community facilities and services impacts property values,

taxes, and economic opportunities, and contributes to the quality of life in the Town of Wood

River. Local features such as parks, schools, utilities, and protective services help define a

community. These facilities and services require substantial investment as supported by the local

tax base, user fees, and impact fees. As a result, their availability is determined both by public

demand for those facilities and services, and by a community’s ability to pay for them.

Therefore, potential impacts on the cost and quality of utilities and community facilities need to

be considered when making decisions concerning the future conservation and development of the

Town of Wood River.

For further detail on existing utilities and community facilities in the Town of Wood River and

Burnett County, please refer to Chapter 4 of the

displays the locations of existing community facilities and services found in the town.

With the amount of population and housing growth that is expected over the next 20 years, the

Town of Wood River should also anticipate the need to maintain and expand utilities,

community facilities, and services. Top issues and opportunities identified during the planning

process (refer to the

and facility improvements and the related tax impacts, the need for additional law enforcement,

and the need for improved facilities at public boat landings. Overall, the town’s plan for utilities

and community facilities is to monitor changing needs, to be prepared for proposed development,

and to make planned improvements as growth warrants the need.

One of the biggest challenges that the town is likely to face with regard to utilities and

community facilities is the impact of growth on the cost of providing such services. Research by

UW-Extension, the American Farmland Trust, and others has shown that not all new

development pays for itself. In other words, the cost of the increased demand on public services

and facilities resulting from new development often exceeds the revenue generated in new taxes

and fees paid. This seems to be true of residential development in particular. As a result, this

plan recommends that substantial new developments provide an analysis of the cost of providing

community services as part of the development review process. It also recommends that impact

fees are considered as a potential tool for funding needed facility and service improvements.

The actual pattern of growth on the landscape can also impact the cost and efficiency of

delivering services. In general, dispersed development is more costly to service than clustered or

concentrated development. This plan recommends that the town carefully manage growth in

order to minimize the demand for increased services and facilities and encourages the use of

cluster or conservation design in order to avoid a dispersed development pattern.

Inventory and Trends Report. Map 4-11Issues and Opportunities element) include the cost of community service

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Source: Division of Historic Preservation at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin,

Wisconsin DOT and Burnett Co Land Information Office. Historical data shown is a

depiction of information taken from various sources of diverse quality. This drawing is

neither a legally recorded map nor a survey and is not intended to be used as one. This

drawing is a compilation of records, information and data used for reference purposes only.

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Wisconsin

COMMUNITY FEATURES

TOWN OF WOOD RIVER

MAP 4 - 1

Legend



Log Camps



 Historic Bridges



 Architecture and Historic Inventory



Ferry Crossing



Historical Roads

 Burnett Co Firsts

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.

Annual Average

Daily Traffic 2002

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.

Annual Average

Daily Traffic 2007

Archaeological Site Inventory

Bibliography of Archaeological Reports

Historic Sites

Annual Average Daily Traffic

Community Facilities



Town/Village Hall

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EMS/Ambulance



Fire Station

Æ

c Library



a Police

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y Boat Launch

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3 Indoor Public Facility

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5 Park

 

Golf

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Airport



Cemetery



Church

 

 Community Center



 Daycare

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d Health Care Clinic

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j Public Parking

!

° Recycling Center

School Athletic Facilty



School - Public

Senior Center

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n Dam

$

8 WW Treatment Plant



Lift Station



Substation

Telephone Utility

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A Tower - Communication

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8 Water Tower

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² Public Well

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º Utility Shop/Office

Base Layers

PLSS Sections

Village Boundary

Township Boundary

State Highway

Town Road

County Highway

Rivers

Lakes

County Boundary

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4.2 Planned Utility and Community Facility Improvements

Comprehensive planning includes identifying the need for expansion, construction, or

rehabilitation of utilities and community facilities. In addition to infrastructure needs, there are

also service level needs that may arise in the community. For example, additional police service,

need for a building inspector, or additional park and recreation services may become necessary.

The Town of Wood River has determined that the following utilities, facilities, and services will

need expansion, construction, rehabilitation, or other improvement over the planning period.

Projects are identified as short-term (1-5 years) and long-term (6-20 years), and if associated

with a specific location in the community, are shown on Map 4-50.

Administrative Facilities and Services

Refer to Section 4.2 of

existing administrative facilities and services in the Town of Wood River.

Short Term

Appendix UCF of the Inventory and Trends Report for information on

Long Term

Maintain current facilities

Improve the town hall for year-round use or share office space with other towns nearby.

Police Services

Refer to Section 4.3 of

existing police services in the Town of Wood River.

Short Term

Appendix UCF of the Inventory and Trends Report for information on

Long Term

Maintain current facilities

Explore the possibility of sharing police service with the Village of Grantsburg.

Fire Protection and EMT/Rescue Services

Refer to Section 4.3 of the

emergency medical/rescue services.

Short Term

Inventory and Trends Report for information on existing fire and

Long Term

Maintain current level of service

Maintain current level of service

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Schools

Refer to Section 4.4 of the

the Town of Wood River. No short term or long term recommendations have been identified.

Existing schools are anticipated to be adequate to meet the needs of the town over the planning

period.

Inventory and Trends Report for information on the schools that serve

Libraries, Cemeteries, and Other Quasi-Public Facilities

Refer to Section 4.5 of the

post offices, and private recreational facilities in Burnett County.

Inventory and Trends Report for information on existing libraries,

Parks and Recreation

Refer to Section 4.6 of

existing park and recreational facilities in Burnett County and the Town of Wood River.

Appendix UCF of the Inventory and Trends Report for information on

Solid Waste and Recycling

Refer to Section 4.7 of

existing solid waste and recycling service in the Town of Wood River.

Short Term

Appendix UCF of the Inventory and Trends Report for information on

recycling.

Continue to allow town residents to individually contract out for solid waste and

Communication and Power Facilities

Refer to Section 4.8 of the

and power facilities that serve the Town of Wood River. No short term or long term

recommendations have been identified. Existing communication and power facilities are

anticipated to be adequate to meet the needs of the town over the planning period.

Inventory and Trends Report for information on the communication

Sanitary Sewer Service

Refer to Section 4.9 of the

service in Burnett County. The Town of Wood River does not provide sanitary sewer service.

Inventory and Trends Report for information on sanitary sewer

Private On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems (POWTS)

Refer to Section 4.10 of the

wastewater treatment systems (POWTS) in Burnett County.

Short Term

Inventory and Trends Report for information on private on-site

Maintain current systems

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4-7

Long Term

Maintain current systems

Public Water

Refer to Section 4.11 of the

in Burnett County.

Inventory and Trends Report for information on public water supply

Stormwater Management

Refer to Section 4.12 of the

management in the Town of Wood River.

Short Term

Inventory and Trends Report for information on stormwater

Long Term

Require new development to provide stormwater management facilities.

Require new development to provide stormwater management facilities.

Health Care and Child Care Facilities

Refer to Sections 4.14 and 4.15 of the

care and child care facilities in Burnett County. No short term or long term recommendations

have been identified. Existing health care and child care facilities are anticipated to be adequate

to meet the needs of the town over the planning period.

Inventory and Trends Report for information on health

Local Roads and Bridges

Refer to the

and Trends Report

Short Term

Transportation element of this plan and the Transportation element of the Inventoryfor information on roads and bridges in Burnett County.

Long Term

Continue to make road improvements based on the Town’s Five Year Plan.

Explore opportunities for intergovernmental cooperation.

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Burnett County,

Wisconsin

PLANNED COMMUNITY

FACILITY AND

TRANSPORTATION

IMPROVEMENTS

TOWN OF WOOD RIVER

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Legend

This map displays data regarding planned physical improvements. This map works

together with the text of the Utilities and Community Facilities and Transportation

elements of the Comprehensive Plan. Nothing on this map commits the community

to a particular road, utility, or community facility improvement project, but rather

shows the overall plan for potential physical improvements at the time of

comprehensive plan adoption.

This map can be used as a reference for comprehensive planning purposes. This map

can be used as a guide when making decisions regarding land use and the coordination

of growth with infrastructure conditions and improvements. Strategic plans such

as park and recreation plans, capital improvement plans, transportation plans,

and the like, should be consistent with this map or used to update this map. This map

can be used as a reference to monitor community growth and change to determine

whether the comprehensive plan has been effectively implemented.

Source: Burnett County

State Plans

New Road

Repair Road

Reconstruct Road

Existing Sanitary Sewer

Service Area

Utility Service Areas

County Plans

Other Transportation Project

New Road

Repair Road

Reconstruct Road

!

(

County Facility Improvement

Long Term (6-20 yrs)

Community Facility Improvement

New Road

Repair Road

Reconstruct Road

Planned Improvements

Local Plans

Short Term (1-5 yrs)

Community Facility Improvement

New Road

Repair Road

Reconstruct Road

[



[



[



MAP 4 - 2

Base Layers

PLSS Sections

Village Boundary

Township Boundary

State Highway

Town Road

County Highway

Rivers

Lakes

County Boundary

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4.3 Utilities and Community Facilities Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1:

community facilities and services, and utilities.

Objectives:

Support the efficiency, quality and coordinated planning of town government,

A. Improve the efficiency of both town service delivery, and town facilities operation. While

striving to meet public expectations with respect to both service levels and costs.

B. Consider the impacts of development proposals on the cost and quality of town and

community facilities and services.

C. Guide intensive development to villages.

D. Determine the need for new, expanded, or rehabilitated services and town government

facilities.

E. Maintain an adequate level of properly trained town staff and volunteers.

F. Explore opportunities to provide or improve town facilities, equipment, and services

cooperatively with other unites of government.

G. Encourage increased coordination between community facilities and utilities planning

and planning for other elements such as land use, transportation, natural resources and

cultural resources.

Goal 2:

Objectives:

Provide quality and accessible parks and recreational facilities

A. Monitor the adequacy of park and recreational facilities, and identify areas where

improvements are needed.

B. Seek improved accessibility for all age groups and abilities at appropriate town park and

recreational facilities.

C. Pursue stat, federal, and private funding programs that can aid in the acquisition and

development of parks, trails, and scenic or environmentally sensitive areas.

D. Maximize the quality of life by providing managed in such a fashion as to afford the

maximum benefit to the community.

E. Consider the continued viability of outdoor recreational pursuits when reviewing

development proposals and making land use decisions.

F. Maintain existing public access to waterways.

G. Support efforts to acquire additional public recreational lands and create additional public

recreational trails when they are consistent with town and local comprehensive plans.

H. Preserve the dignity and esthetic quality of town cemeteries.

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4-12 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Goal 3

Objectives:

: Ensure proper disposal of wastewater to protect ground water and surface water.

A. Assess the potential to groundwater when reviewing a proposed development that will

rely on private onsite wastewater treatment systems.

B. Work cooperatively with providers of public wastewater treatment when reviewing a

proposed development that will rely on public sewer service.

C. Encourage the use of alternative wastewater treatment options (i.e., new technologies

group sanitary systems, public sewer, etc.) where appropriate.

Goal 4:

needs of residents, businesses, industry, and agriculture.

Objectives:

Ensure that the town’s water supply remains drinkable, and is available to meet the

A. Continue to provide town-wide leadership and coordination of efforts to monitor

groundwater quality and potential contamination issues.

B. Encourage the increased use of wellhead protection planning as cooperative efforts

between municipalities.

C. Consider the potential impacts of development proposals on public and private wells.

Goal 5

flooding.

Objectives:

: Ensure that roads, structures, and other improvements are reasonably protected from

A. Support the preservation of environmental features that minimize flooding such as

wetlands and floodplains.

B. Consider the potential impacts of development proposals on the adequacy of existing and

proposed stormwater management features including stormwater storage areas, culverts,

ditches and, bridges.

C. Prevent increased runoff from new developments to reduce potential flooding and flood

damage.

D. Establish the use of stormwater management practices to abate non-point source pollution

and address water quality.

Goal 6:

health, natural environment, and general appearance of land use in the town.

Objectives:

Promote effective solid waste disposal and recycling services that protect the public

A. Support public involvement in decisions involving the type, location, and extent of

disposal facilities and services provided in the town.

B. Continually evaluate town provisions for solid waste, hazardous waste, and recycling

services and opportunities for greater cooperation or cost-effectiveness.

C. Require substantial development proposals to adequately address solid waste disposal and

recycling needs.

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Goal 7:

serve existing and planned development.

Objectives:

Ensure the provision of reliable, efficient, and well-planned utilities to adequately

A. Cooperate in the planning and coordination of utilities with other agencies and units of

government where possible.

B. Minimize conflicts between land uses and balance desired service levels with potential

negative impacts to the environment, community character, and planned growth areas

when reviewing the proposed design and location of telecommunication, wind energy, or

other utility towers.

C. Support development of alternative and renewable energy sources.

Goal 8:

Objectives:

Support access to quality health and child care facilities.

A. Carefully consider request for the development of properly located and operated health

care and child facilities.

B. Support school districts and community organizations in their sponsor ship of child care

programs and early development programs.

C. Support improved transportation options to and from regional health care facilities.

Goal 9:

the needs of existing and planned future development patterns.

Objectives:

Ensure a level of police protection, fire protection, and emergency services that meets

A. Support an adequate level of police protection, law enforcement, and emergency response

through Sheriff and emergency Managements programs.

B. Support the provision of fire protection and emergency services through local fire

departments, ambulance services, and first responders.

C. Encourage the continued use of police, fire, and emergency medical service mutual aid

and cooperative agreements.

D. Support the formation of community watch programs in the town.

E. Promote continued long range planning with Grantsburg Fire Association.

Goal 10:

Objectives:

Promote quality schools and access to educational opportunities.

A. Coordinate planning efforts with the school districts that serve the town in order to allow

them to anticipate future growth and demographic changes.

B. Support school districts, technical colleges, University of Wisconsin Extension, and

community libraries in their efforts to increase community education.

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4-14 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

4.4 Utilities and Community Facilities Policies and

Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

UCF 1. Capital expenditures for the major expansion or rehabilitation of existing facilities

or services shall be supported by an approved Capital Improvement Plan. Capital

expenditures for the establishment of new facilities or services shall be handled on

a case-by-case basis.

UCF 2. Continue to annually update a detailed capital improvement plan that includes

transportation, public facility, and other capital needs. The plan should prioritize

short-term and long-term needs, include equipment needs, identify potential

funding sources, and discuss contingency plans in the event that funds are not

available.

UCF 3. Substantial development proposals shall provide an assessment of potential

impacts to the cost of providing Town facilities and services. The depth of

analysis required by the Town will be appropriate for the intensity of the proposed

development.

UCF 4. Planned utilities, service facilities and roads shall be designed to limit the impact

to environmental corridors, natural features and working lands (farmland and

woodlands).

UCF 5. A proportional share of the cost of improvement, extension, or construction of

public facilities shall be borne by those whose land development and

redevelopment actions that made such improvement, extension, or construction

necessary.

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UCF 6. New utility systems should be required to locate in existing rights-of way

whenever possible.

UCF 7. The Town shall review all telecommunication and other utility tower proposals.

UCF 8. The Town should encourage the shared development of all public capital facilities

including community facilities such as parks, libraries, schools, police department,

other emergency services and community meeting facilities.

UCF 9. The Town should consider intergovernmental, cooperative options before

establishing, expanding, or rehabilitating community facilities, utilities, or

services.

UCF 10. All town buildings should meet ADA requirements and have adequate capacity to

facilitate community meetings or gatherings.

UCF 11. The Town should support efforts that are consistent with the comprehensive plan

to expand public recreational resources such as parks, trails, waterway access,

public hunting and fishing areas, wildlife viewing areas, and the like.

UCF 12. The Town should coordinate park and recreation planning with Burnett County to

meet the demands of a changing and increasing population where feasible.

UCF 13. Trail development projects supported by the Town shall have a long term

development plan that addressed ongoing maintenance and funding, presents

solutions for possible trail use conflicts, and enhances opportunities for

interconnected trail networks.

UCF 14. New development and planned utilities shall use best management practices for

construction and site erosion control.

UCF 15. Support the responsible use of all types of watercraft and assess the impact of

these uses in regard to noise, visual disturbances and water quality.

UCF 16. Support there responsible use of motorized recreational vehicles and assess the

impact of these vehicles in regard to such issues as noise, erosion, light, order and

aesthetics.

UCF 17. Neighborhood parks should be incorporated into the design of future subdivisions

as warranted.

UCF 18. All unsewered subdivisions shall be designed to protect the immediate

groundwater supply through the proper placement and operation of private wills

and on-site wastewater treatment systems.

UCF 19. Regular inspections of existing on-site sewage treatment systems should be

conducted within urban areas.

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UCF 20. In areas adjacent to incorporated communities or where there is a public well

and/or distribution system, wellhead planning should be completed and wellhead

protection shall be a priority when reviewing development proposals.

UCF 21. The Town shall review new residential (cluster or high density) projects for the

availability of an adequate water supply.

UCF 22. Proposed developments shall not increase flooding potential to adjacent lands or

adversely affect the water supply to adjacent land.

UCF 23. Erosion and sediment control practices shall be used when removing the vegetative

cover of the land or exposing the soil for housing.

UCF 24. Stormwater runoff as the result of development shall not be discharged into

wetland and closed depressions, except for those associated with approved

stormwater management.

UCF 25. The Town will require new development projects to include approved stormwater

management facilities, as needed.

UCF 26. The Town shall periodically monitor the effectiveness of the waste management

and recycling services provided by private contractors.

UCF 27. The town shall maintain adequate staffing and professional service levels relative

to planning, ordinance development and enforcement, and other governmental

services to successfully implement the comprehensive plan.

UCF 28. The Town shall through the association membership and contracting maintain

adequate emergency service staffing, training, space, and equipment in order to

maintain response times and the quality of service.

UCF 29. The Town shall continue to work with police, fire and rescue service providers to

anticipate and plan for service requirements and capital improvements.

UCF 30. Work with local school districts in order to anticipate future service and facility

needs.

UCF 31. Land uses compatible to school facilities that produce little noise and minimal

traffic shall be pursued and planned for near any future school facilities.

4.5 Utilities and Community Facilities Programs

For descriptions of utilities and community facilities programs potentially available to the

community, refer to the

Inventory and Trends Report

Utilities and Community Facilities element of the Burnett County.

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5. Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural

Resources

5.1 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Plan

Land development patterns are directly linked to the agricultural, natural, and cultural resource

base of a community. This resource base has limitations with respect to the potential impacts of

development activities. Development should be carefully adjusted to coincide with the ability of

the agricultural, natural, and cultural resource base to support the various forms of urban and

rural development. If a balance is not maintained, the underlying resource base may deteriorate

in quality. Therefore, these features need to be considered when making decisions concerning

the future conservation and development of the Town of Wood River. For further detail on

agricultural, natural, and cultural resources in the Town of Wood River and Burnett County,

please refer to Chapter 5 of the

The

in the

opportunities identified by the town during the planning process (refer to the

Opportunities

surface water and groundwater quality, preserving woodlands and wildlife, protecting rural

character and scenic views, limiting noise and light pollution, preserving agricultural lands,

preventing conflicts between agriculture and rural housing development, preventing conflicts

over mineral resources, and preserving historic and archeological sites. Some of the strongest

points of consensus on the public opinion surveys were related to these resources and include:

protecting groundwater, wetlands, and waterways; protecting forests and wildlife habitat;

protecting farmland and productive soils; supporting the agriculture industry; protecting rural

character; and protecting historical sites and structures.

Inventory and Trends Report.Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources element may be the most important elementTown of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan. Many of the issues andIssues andelement) are related to these resources. The town is concerned with preserving

Agricultural Resources

Agriculture is a significant component of the Town of Wood River’s landscape, and the town’s

agriculture operations are connected to a larger region of farming that spans several counties.

The town’s plan for agricultural resources is to preserve agricultural lands and the right to farm

while also allowing for planned development. Higher density residential development is planned

on lands that are less suitable for agricultural use. Lower density development would be allowed

on lands critical to the town’s agricultural base. Key components and considerations of the

town’s approach include establishing a maximum lot size in certain areas, limiting major

subdivisions to planned growth areas, encouraging conservation land division design,

establishing site planning guidelines, and potentially revising the zoning map that applies to the

town. The town also plans to explore the creation of a purchase of development rights (PDR) or

purchase of conservation easement (PACE) program in cooperation with Burnett County.

Substantial agricultural resources are present in the Town of Wood River. According to the 2007

Land Use Assessment data, there were approximately 9,453 acres of farmland in the town.

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In other words, over 41.4% of the land is used for agricultural purposes. According to the

Burnett County Soil Survey, Wood River has 12,150 (over 53% of the town) acres of soils that

are classified as prime, prime if drained, and soils of statewide significance. A variety of

agriculture operations conduct business in the town and primarily include cash cropping and

vegetable farming especially associated with irrigated lands. Dairy has a large presence within

the Town since the Burnett Dairy Co-op operates within the community of Alpha Approximately

50% of the land in the Town of Wood River is considered prime agricultural or prime when

drained.

Agriculture lands are significant in the Town of Wood River, and these lands are expected to

continue in agricultural use over the long term. This sentiment is reflected in the preferred future

land use plan (refer to the

mapped for Agriculture (A). The (A) Future Land Use Management Area seeks to preserve and

promote a full range of agricultural uses and prevent the conversion of land to uses not consistent

with agriculture.

Irrigated cropland brings with it unique land management and planning implications. Irrigated

lands represent substantial infrastructure investments that turn otherwise unproductive land into

reliable areas for vegetable production. Because such a substantial investment would be made to

create these productive lands, it is unlikely that they will be converted to other non-agricultural

uses during the planning period. Unlike many other types of farmland, the market value of

irrigated land is as much as, if not more than, the value of the land for development.

Land Use element) as most of the town’s agricultural lands have been

Natural and Cultural Resources

The Town of Wood River’s plan for natural and cultural resources is to help ensure that existing

regulations are followed in the town and to manage growth to prevent negative impacts to these

resources. Natural and cultural resources are abundant in the town and are highly valued by the

town’s residents. Preserving rural character, forest resources, and outdoor recreational

opportunities are primary concerns as reflected in the town’s goals and objectives, its issues and

opportunities, and the results of the planning process surveys. Substantial natural and cultural

resources are present in the town and include the following:

2,185 acres of wetlands

3,088 acres of floodplains

Many of the same tools that will be used to protect agriculture could also be used to protect

natural and cultural resources, including a maximum residential lot size, conservation land

division design, site planning guidelines, the zoning map, and a possible transfer or purchase of

development rights program. In addition the town may require substantial development

proposals assess potential natural and cultural resources impacts. Other tools recommended for

cultural resources include maintaining the inventory of historic and archeological sites and

creating a historic preservation ordinance.

1,193 acres of surface water

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5.2 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Goals and

Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Agricultural Resources

Goals 1:

agricultural resources for current and future generations.

Objectives:

Maintain the viability, operational efficiency, and productivity of the town’s

A. Help protect through local and state measures the town’s productive lands from

accelerated erosion and unwise development.

B. Protect productive farmland from fragmentation and conflicts with non-agricultural uses.

C. Allow for farming expansion in areas where conflict with existing residential land uses

can be prevented or mitigated.

D. Protect the investments made, in both public infrastructure (roads) and private lands and

improvements, that support the agricultural industry.

E. Encourage creative, unique and niche forms of agriculture.

F. Promote opportunities to allow farmers and farmland owners to secure financial benefits

for the preservation of agricultural lands.

G. Encourage the use of agricultural science-based Best Management Practices to minimize

erosion and ground water and surface water contamination.

H. Support programs that provide mentoring of younger farmers.

I. Increase awareness relative to the importance of protecting the viability of the town’s

agricultural industry.

J. Increase awareness and understanding of farming operations, noises, odors and use of

roadways by farm vehicles and equipment.

Goal 2:

Objectives:

Balance the protection of farmland with the exercise of development rights.

A. Identify lands where the primary intent is to preserve productive farmland and to allow

for farming expansion.

B. Identify lands where the primary intent is to allow for rural residential development.

C. Encourage adequate buffers between agricultural uses and residential neighborhoods to

minimize potential conflicts.

D. Consider establishing site design requirements and standards that direct low density rural

residential development to areas that minimize conflicts between residential and

agricultural land uses and maintain the rural character of the town.

E. Explore the right to farm clauses and there uses.

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Goal 3:

Objectives:

Promote agricultural development as an economic development resource in the town.

A. Encourage county economic development agent to consider agriculture and related agbusiness.

Natural Resources

Goal 1:

Objectives:

Encourage the efficient management of the Town’s natural resources.

A. Work with the county to implement and maintain a town wide recreation plan.

B. Support the maintenance of the county’s farmland preservation plan.

C. Protect the public’s access to public hunting and fishing areas.

D. Develop management strategies to create a sustainable relationship between recreational

vehicles, watercraft, and natural resources.

E. Encourage communication between communities regarding the protection of natural

resources that cross municipal boundaries.

F. Educate resource users of the town’s environmental quality goals and objectives.

Goal 2:

Objectives:

Protect and improve the quality and quantity of the town’s ground and surface water.

A. Ensure that land use practices do not have detrimental impacts on the town’s water and

wetlands.

B. Support wetlands protection in the town.

C. Prevent the introduction of new contaminants into the town’s ground and surface water

systems while reducing and possibly eliminating existing sources of contamination.

D. Increase awareness relative to the potential shoreline development impacts on water

quality.

E. Support data collection and monitoring efforts that further the understanding of factors

influencing the quantity, quality, and flow patterns for ground water.

F. Support the preservation of natural buffers and building setbacks between intensive land

uses and surface water features.

G. Continue to develop partnerships with neighboring communities, conservation

organizations, county and state agencies to address water quality issues.

Goal 3:

Preserve the natural and scenic qualities of lakes and shorelines in the town.

Objectives:

A. Support the protection of lakes and rivers.

B. Support the County’s continued evaluating of the lakes and rivers classification system

which recognizes that different lakes have varying natural conditions affecting their

environmental sensitivity or vulnerability to shoreland development. The lake

classification system should take into account lake surface areas, lake depth, lake type,

length of shoreline, size of watershed, and existing degree of development.

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C. Balance the needs for environmental protection and responsible stewardship with

reasonable use of private property and economic development.

D. Carefully manage future development and land divisions on lakes that are developed or

partially developed to prevent overcrowding that would diminish the value of the

resource and existing shoreland property; minimize nutrient loading; protect water

quality; preserve spawning grounds, fish and wildlife habitats, and natural shore cover.

Goal 4:

Balance future development with the protection of natural resources.

Objectives:

A. Consider the potential impacts of development proposals on groundwater quality and

quantity, surface water quality, open space, wildlife habitat, woodlands, and impact of

light intrusion on the night sky.

B. Direct future growth away from regulated wetlands and floodplains.

C. Promote public and private efforts to protect critical habitats for plant and animal life.

D. Promote the utilization of public and non-profit resource conservation and protection

programs such as Managed Forest Law (MFL), Conservation Reserve Program (CRP),

and conservation easements.

E. Promote renewable energy conservation within new and existing developments.

Goal 5:

Objectives:

Protect air quality.

A. Regulate outdoor burning except for material that is pulp in nature.

B. Manage growth to minimize conflict between residences and agricultural odors and dust.

Goal 6:

and environmental values.

Objectives:

Preserve and protect woodlands and forest resources for their economic, aesthetic,

A. Conserve large contiguous wooded tracts in order to reduce forest fragmentation,

maximize woodland interiors, and reduce the edge/ area ratio.

B. Consider the use of conservation land division design, which reduces further forest

fragmentation.

C. Support efforts that preserve the integrity of manage forest lands.

D. Encourage forestry practices that encourage woodland buffers during woodland harvest.

E. Support educational resources on forestry practices and the benefits to a healthy forest.

Goal 7:

impacts on the town.

Objectives:

Balance future needs for the extraction of mineral resources with potential adverse

A. Encourage the documentation of known economically viable non-metallic mineral

deposits to ensure proper coordination with any new proposed developed.

B. Support the county efforts to regulate non-metallic mineral extraction operations to

minimize adverse impacts on adjacent land uses and to ensure proper site reclamation.

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C. Consider the potential adverse impacts of proposed metallic mineral extraction

operations, and ensure that the sighting of such facilities will not negatively impact town

and county resources.

Cultural Resources

Goal 1:

landscapes, undeveloped lands, forest, water resources, wildlife, farms, rural and small town

atmosphere, buildings integrated with the landscape, and enjoyment of these surroundings.

Objectives:

Preserve the Northwood’s character as defined by scenic beauty, a variety of

A. Consider the potential impacts of development proposals on those features that the town

values

B. Eliminate the accumulation of junk vehicles, poorly maintained properties, unsightly

advertising, and roadside litter.

C. Support the efforts of Burnett County’s villages to preserve a small town atmosphere

including attractive community entrances, small businesses, a vital downtown, and

community culture and events.

D. Encourage the growth and development of visual, performance, and cultural arts.

Goal 2:

that contribute to community identity and character.

Objectives:

Preserve significant historical and cultural lands, sites, neighborhoods and structures

A. Identify, record, and protect community features with historical or archaeological

significance.

B. Consider the potential impacts of development proposals on historical and archeological

resources.

C. Promote the history, culture, and heritage of the town.

Goal 3:

facilities and additional job opportunities.

Objectives:

Strengthen opportunities for youth in the town including youth-oriented activities and

A. Involve youth in the comprehensive planning process.

B. Establish the involvement of youth in town decision making.

C. Support youth development programs.

5.3 Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources Policies and

Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

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strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Agricultural Resources

Policies and Recommendations

ANC 1. New development should be directed to the least productive soils and Burnett

County’s villages to conserve remaining land for continued agricultural uses,

whenever possible.

ANC 2. Work with the county to recognize preferred areas for agricultural expansion and

to preserve the agricultural lands for agricultural use.

ANC 3. Utilize site planning and a maximum residential lot size to preserve agricultural

lands.

ANC 4. Work with the county to develop a countywide right to farm policy and ordinance.

Encourage options for towns that wish to require right to farm language to be

shown on recorded land divisions.

ANC 5. New non-farm residential development shall be directed away from existing

agricultural operations or large tracts of undeveloped land and directed toward

those areas that have existing non-farm development.

ANC 6. New non-farm residential development should be subject to a “nuisance

disclaimer”, stringent deed restrictions or other mutual agreement intended to

protect the “right-to-farm” of existing and future agricultural operations.

ANC 7. Work with the county to educate townships on the existing Farmland Preservation

Plan.

ANC 8. Conservation and cluster land division design shall be supported as options for

proposed major land divisions to minimize the negative impacts to agriculture,

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active farms, natural resources, cultural resources, and rural character while

accommodating residential development.

ANC 9. Work with the county to create a countywide easement donation program or

purchase of development rights program.

ANC 10. Consistent with Wisconsin Act 235, the establishment of new or expansion of

existing animal agriculture operations that result in farms with more than 500 or

more animal units shall comply with performance standards for setbacks, odor

management, waste and nutrient management, waste storage facilities, runoff

management, and mortality management.

ANC 11. Town of Wood River shall work to sustain agricultural lands by assisting operators

who want sell to keep the agricultural land in production.

ANC 12. Town of Wood River shall work with Burnett County Development Association

and Northwest Regional Planning Commission to recognize the agricultural

industry as important as any other industry in terms of providing tools and

assistance for economic development.

ANC 13. Town of Wood River shall work to preserve agricultural lands when possible.

ANC 14. Recognize important relationships between Burnett Dairy and the agricultural

industry in the Town of Wood River.

Natural Resources

Policies and Recommendations

ANC 15. Environmental corridors shall be defined by location of WDNR designated

wetlands and FEMA designated floodplains.

ANC 16. Substantial development proposals within the Town should provide an analysis of

the potential natural resources impacts including, but not necessarily limited to,

potential impacts to groundwater quality and quantity, surface water, wetlands,

floodplains, and woodlands. The depth of analysis required by the Town will be

appropriate for the intensity of the proposed development.

ANC 17. Federal, state and county regulation changes or additions regarding agricultural,

natural and cultural resources will be consistently monitored for their impact on

local resources.

ANC 18. Development proposals in shoreland areas shall demonstrate compliance with the

Burnett County Shoreland Zoning Ordinance.

ANC 19. Conservation and cluster land division design shall be supported as options for

proposed major land divisions to minimize the negative impacts to agriculture,

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active farms, natural resources, cultural resources, and rural character while

accommodating residential development.

ANC 20. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Best Management Practices and

USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service standards and specifications shall

be utilized to the maximum extent possible for activities approved in forests,

shorelands, and wetlands.

ANC 21. Lakeshore development shall be in concert with lakes classification and the county

zoning ordinance.

ANC 22. The development of lake associations and districts will be supported.

ANC 23. Work to ensure secure public lake access where possible.

ANC 24. New development should be placed on the landscape in a fashion that minimizes

potential negative impacts to natural resources such as shoreline areas, wetlands,

and floodplains.

ANC 25. Streets shall be designed and located in such a manner as to maintain and preserve

natural topography, cover, significant landmarks, and trees, and to preserve views

and vistas.

ANC 26. Work with the County to identify preferred areas for forestry and forestry

production.

ANC 27. Encourage the enrollment of private lands into local, state, and federal resource

protection programs (such as Managed Forest Law etc).

ANC 28. Trail development will be required to have a long-term development plan with

consideration toward management of trail use and future conditions.

ANC 29. Establish a permit system and town review for events that have the potential to

negatively impact the natural resources of the Town (these events may include, but

not limited to: fishing contest, land and water and motorized vehicle races).

ANC 30. Support the county’s efforts in development of comprehensive river, stream and

lake management plans that include surveys, assessment and monitoring, and

recommendations for restoration and improvement.

ANC 31. Evaluate the community’s ability to respond to a spill of contaminated or

hazardous material and make changes as necessary to ensure that spills will be

remediated as soon as possible to decrease the effects on groundwater.

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Cultural Resources

Policies and Recommendations

ANC 32. Substantial development proposals should provide the Town with an analysis of

the potential cultural resources impacts including, but not necessarily limited to,

potential impacts to historic sites, archeological sites, and other cultural resources.

The depth of analysis required by the Town will be appropriate for the intensity of

the proposed development.

ANC 33. New development should be placed on the landscape in a fashion that minimizes

potential negative impacts to Northwood’s character as defined by locally

significant landmarks, scenic views and vistas, rolling terrain, undeveloped lands,

farmlands and woodlands, aesthetically pleasing landscapes and buildings, limited

light pollution, and quiet enjoyment of these surroundings.

ANC 34. Work with groups/organizations such as the Wisconsin Historical Society and the

Burnett County Historical Society to maintain the map and database of historic and

archeological sites.

ANC 35. Identify, record, and promote preservation of historical, cultural and

archaeological sites within the community.

ANC 36. A community survey of historical and archeological resources should be

conducted at least once every twenty years.

ANC 37. Review proposals for the development of properties abutting historic resources to

ensure that land use or new construction does not detract from the architectural

characteristics and environmental setting of the historic resource.

5.4 Agriculture, Natural, and Cultural Resources Programs

For descriptions of agricultural, natural and cultural resources programs potentially available to

the community, refer to the

County Inventory and Trends Report

Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources element of the Burnett.

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6. Economic Development

6.1 Economic Development Plan

Economic development planning is the process by which a community organizes, analyzes,

plans, and then applies its energies to the tasks of improving the economic well-being and quality

of life for those in the community. Issues and opportunities in the Town of Wood River related

to economic development mainly includes supporting regional economic development efforts in

Burnett County Villages and in areas that have the necessary infrastructure to support intensive

commercial development, and supporting tourism, agriculture, forestry, home-based business.

All of these issues affect residents of the Town of Wood River and are addressed directly or

indirectly in the comprehensive plan.

The reason to plan for economic development is straight-forward - economic development

provides income for individuals, households, farms, businesses, and units of government. It

requires working together to maintain a strong economy by creating and retaining desirable jobs

which provide a good standard of living for individuals. Increased personal income and wealth

increases the tax base, so a community can provide the level of services residents expect. A

balanced, healthy economy is essential for community well-being. Well-planned economic

development expenditures are a community investment. They leverage new growth and

redevelopment to improve the area. Influencing and investing in the process of economic

development allows community members to determine future direction and guide appropriate

types of development according to their values.

Successful plans for economic development acknowledge the importance of:

Knowing the region’s economic function in the global economy.

Creating a skilled and educated workforce.

Investing in an infrastructure for innovation.

Creating a great quality of life.

Fostering an innovative business climate.

Increased use of technology and cooperation to increase government efficiency.

The Town of Wood River’s plan for economic development is to maintain the quality of life that

attracts residents, visitors, and businesses to the area, to support wireless and hard-line

broadband service infrastructure to the area to promote tele-commuting and home-based business

development. Wood River does not have intensive areas planned for commercial uses by design

and also encourages all new industrial development to be located within the county’s villages.

The plan is to retain existing businesses and have a mixed use area that focuses on local service

delivery and uses. Wood River does not envision significant local administration to function and

deliver services to residents and property owners, and is not positioning for regional community

competitiveness related to attracting new business. Wood River has established commercial and

industrial development policies as necessary, but the long term economic development focus is

related to encouraging sustainable residential development, supporting tourism, agriculture,

forestry, home-based business, and improving overall quality of life. In the event that new local

Taking regional governance and collaboration seriously.

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commercial or industrial uses are found to be consistent with the plan, it will be important to

address the site design and development characteristics to ensure compatibility with surrounding

development and preservation of the areas rural character. The Town of Wood River exhibits

some unique economic characteristics. The town’s rural land base also plays an important

economic role by supporting tourism and outdoor recreation, and by providing opportunities for

quality, affordable housing.

Many of the top issues and opportunities identified during the planning process (refer to the

Issues and Opportunities

development, costs and delivery of services, and management of rural character. The rural

character and low population concentration of the town does not support typical economic

development strategy in the sense of new commercial buildings or a business park, but rather one

focused on capitalizing on existing strengths such as waterfront development, home-based

business, and natural resource management. The town is concerned with the amount and design

of commercial development, the potential for light and noise pollution, and the negative

economic and environmental impacts that might accompany such development, recruiting and

retaining businesses that contribute to the tax base, and the potential for expanded employment

in the services sector. In order to address these issues and opportunities and to implement the

town’s plan for economic development, this plan includes recommendations to develop a site and

architectural design review ordinance. Commercial and industrial development will be required

to meet certain standards for building and site design as guided by the town’s economic

development policies. The plan also recommends supporting the enhancement of relationships

between educational institutions and potential employers.

element) center around natural resources, lakefront and water related

6.2 Economic Characteristics Summary

This section provides detail on educational attainment and employment in the Town of Wood

River. For further information on economic development in the Town of Wood River and

Burnett County, please refer to Chapter 6 of the

Inventory and Trends Report.

Educational Attainment

Table 6-1 displays the educational attainment level of Burnett County and Town of Wood River

residents who were age 25 and older in 2000. The educational attainment level of persons within

a community can provide insight into household income, job availability, and the economic well

being of the community. Lower educational attainment levels in a community can be a

hindrance to attracting certain types of businesses, typically those that require highly specialized

technical skills and upper management positions.

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Table 6-1

Educational Attainment of Persons Age 25 and Over, Burnett County

and Town of Wood River, 2000

Percent of Percent of

Attainment Level Number Total Number Total

Less than 9th grade 31 4.7% 687 6.1%

9th grade to 12th grade, no diploma 55 8.3% 1,257 11.2%

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 288 43.4% 4,811 42.7%

Some college, no degree 137 20.6% 2,296 20.4%

Associate degree 46 6.9% 645 5.7%

Bachelor's degree 74 11.1% 1,131 10.0%

Graduate or professional degree 33 5.0% 446 4.0%

Total Persons 25 and over 664 100.0% 11,273 100.0%

Town of Wood River Burnett County

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-3, 2000.

Educational attainment for the Town of Wood River as measured in 2000 was fairly similar to

that of the county. In each case, slightly less than half of the adult population is a high school

graduate and approximately 10% of the population has a bachelor’s degree. These data suggest

that residents of the Town of Wood River are equipped to participate in all levels of the local and

regional workforce, but also that the town can improve its position in the marketplace if more

people were to reach a high school graduate level of attainment.

Employment by Industry

The employment by industry within an area illustrates the structure of the economy.

Historically, the State of Wisconsin has had a high concentration of employment in

manufacturing and agricultural sectors of the economy. More recent state and national trends

indicate a decreasing concentration of employment in the manufacturing sector while

employment within the services sector is increasing. This trend can be partly attributed to the

aging of the population and increases in technology.

Table 6-2 displays the number and percent of employed persons by industry group in the Town

of Wood River, Burnett County, and the State of Wisconsin for 2000.

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Table 6-2

Employment by Industry, Town of Wood River, Burnett County, and

Wisconsin, 2000

Industry Number

Percent of

Total Number

Percent of

Total

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining 29 5.5% 300 4.4%

Construction 45 8.5% 610 8.8%

Manufacturing 151 28.5% 1,446 21.0%

Wholesale trade 13 2.5% 143 2.1%

Retail trade 49 9.3% 807 11.7%

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities 31 5.9% 281 4.1%

Information 12 2.3% 112 1.6%

Finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing 13 2.5% 235 3.4%

Professional, scientific, management, administrative, and

waste management services 25 4.7% 244 3.5%

Educational, health and social services 97 18.3% 1,271 18.4%

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation and food

services 40 7.6% 778 11.3%

Other services (except public administration) 13 2.5% 309 4.5%

Public administration 11 2.1% 357 5.2%

Total 529 100.0% 6,893 100.0%

Town of Wood River Burnett County

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-3, 2000.

Of the 529 Town of Wood River residents employed in 2000, most worked in the manufacturing;

educational, health, and social services; or public retail trade sectors. The breakdown of

employment by industry sector in the town is very similar to that of Burnett County as a whole,

with some key distinctions. Notably larger proportions of town employment are found in the

manufacturing sector and a lower proportion of the employment is found in arts, entertainment,

recreation, accommodations and food services sector, as well as in the public administration

sector.

Employment by Occupation

The previous section, employment by industry, described employment by the type of business or

industry, or sector of commerce. What people do, or what their occupation is within those

sectors provides additional insight into the local and county economy. This information is

displayed in Table 6-3.

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Table 6-3

Employment by Occupation, Town of Wood River, Burnett County, and

Wisconsin, 2000

Occupation Number

Percent of

Total Number

Percent of

Total Number

Percent of

Total

Management, professional, and related

occupations 141 26.7% 1,762 25.6% 857,205 31.3%

Service occupations 82 15.5% 1,234 17.9% 383,619 14.0%

Sales and office occupations 100 18.9% 1,407 20.4% 690,360 25.2%

Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations 11 2.1% 125 1.8% 25,725 0.9%

Construction, extraction, and maintenance

occupations 49 9.3% 850 12.3% 237,086 8.7%

Production, transportation, and material moving

occupations 146 27.6% 1,515 22.0% 540,930 19.8%

Total 529 100.0% 6,893 100.0% 2,734,925 100.0%

Town of Wood River Burnett County State of Wisconsin

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, STF-3, 2000.

Employment by occupation in the Town of Wood River is similar to that of Burnett County.

Compared to the county as a whole, however, there are notably larger proportions employed in

farming, fishing, and forestry occupations, as well as in production, transportation, and material

moving occupations. These are offset by notably smaller proportions in management and

professional services. These differences are logical given the local characteristics in educational

attainment and employment by industry.

6.3 Desired Business and Industry

Similar to most communities in Burnett County, the Town of Wood River would welcome most

economic opportunities that do not sacrifice community character or require a disproportionate

level of community services per taxes gained. In this context, “business” could include any type

of commercial use from a home-based business to a retail store, office, or other similar use. The

categories or particular types of new businesses and industries that are desired by the community

are generally described in the goals, objectives, and policies within this document. Desired types

of business and industry in Burnett County include, but are not necessarily limited to:

Business and light industry that retain the rural character of the community.

design.

Business and light industry that utilize high quality and attractive building and landscape

Business and light industry that utilize well planned site design and traffic circulation.

Business and light industry that revitalize and redevelops blighted areas of the town.

surrounding neighborhood, such as retail stores, personal services, and professional

services.

Businesses that provide essential services that are otherwise not available in the

surrounding neighborhood.

Home based businesses that blend in with residential land use and do not harm the

Business and light industry that provide quality employment for local citizens.

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processes.

Business and light industry that support existing employers with value adding services or

Business and light industry that bring new cash flow into the community.

development efforts in the Village of Grantsburg.

Business and light industry that fill a unique niche in the town and complement economic

Business and light industry that capitalize on community strengths.

Business and light industry that do not exacerbate community weaknesses.

6.4 Sites for Business and Industrial Development

Sites for business and industrial development are detailed on the future land use map (Map 8-2)

for the Town of Wood River. Generally speaking, the Town of Wood River is not planning for

significant areas of commercial and/or industrial development. The primary economic

development opportunities will be through the expansion of home based businesses in the town’s

residential and rural areas, including some limited waterfront-oriented businesses where

appropriate. The expansion and access of wireless broadband internet technology will be a

significant driver to stimulation the expansion or opportunity of home based business

development. Such uses will be required to meet the applicable

policies of other relative element included in this plan. Other areas of the town might also be

considered for more intensive business development upon approval of a plan amendment or

rezoning as appropriate. The Town of Wood River is pro economic growth and opportunity, as

generally described in the Town’s Goals, Objectives, Policies, and Recommendations; however,

the majority of business development within the County is encouraged to take place within the

Villages of Grantsburg, Siren, and Webster where adequate utilities and infrastructure exist or

are planned for expansion.

While there are no industrial parks in the Town of Wood River, there are three industrial and

business parks located in Burnett County, the Grantsburg Industrial Park, the Webster Industrial

Park and the Siren Industrial Park. The industrial and business parks in Burnett County occupy a

total of 120 acres, of which 68 acres are currently occupied. Therefore, 52 acres, or 43% of the

County’s existing industrial and business park lands are available for future development.

Land Use element policies, and

Environmentally Contaminated Sites

Brownfields, or environmentally contaminated sites, may also be good candidates for clean-up

and reuse for business or industrial development. The WDNR’s Bureau of Remediation and

Redevelopment Tracking System (BRRTS) has been reviewed for contaminated sites that may

be candidates for redevelopment in the community. For the Town of Wood River, as of March

2007, there were no sites identified by BRRTS as being located within the town and as being

open or conditionally closed (indicating that further remediation may be necessary).

6.5 Economic Development Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

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statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1:

rural lands and provide opportunity for compatible economic growth and development.

Objectives:

Maintain and enhance opportunities for agricultural based industries dependent on

A. Encourage resource based industries including agriculture, forest, and tourism which are

consistent with the goals of this plan.

B. Support agricultural and forestry working lands through appropriate utilization of land

use planning and regulations.

C. Support county efforts to establish the value of existing and potential agricultural land

and help preserve them through the development of an agricultural “Transfer of

Development Rights” (TDR) and/or “Purchase of Development Rights” (PDR) program.

These shall be supported by a priority system, a revenue mechanism, and an

information/education program.

D. Discourage any type of development, not agriculturally related, on prime agricultural

soils or lands designated for exclusive agriculture.

E. Encourage continuation of the family farm.

F. Encourage creative, unique and niche forms of agriculture.

G. Support programs that coordinate the selling of local products within local

establishments.

H. Support programs that provide opportunities for farmers to network to increase the

potential to share knowledge, resources, and equipment.

Goal 2:

employment and personal income base of the Town

Attract, retain, and expand quality businesses and industries that will improve the.

Objectives:

A. Encourage long term business investments that generate net fiscal benefits to the town,

protect environmental quality, and provide increase to net personal income.

B. Support incentives to those businesses of all sizes which demonstrate a commitment to

protecting the environment and enhancing the town’s quality of life.

C. Promote economic opportunity for all residents, including unemployed, underemployed,

and special needs populations.

D. Encourage diversified economic development to achieve and maintain a balanced tax

base.

E. Support agriculture, forestry, manufacturing, tourism, and related support services as

strong components of the local economy.

F. Support the further development of an ecological tourism (ecotourism) industry in the

town and region to build environmental and cultural awareness, and benefit the local

economy.

G. Support the further development of an agricultural tourism (agri-tourism) industry in the

town and region to build awareness of the importance of agriculture, an understanding of

operations, and benefit the local economy.

H. Support the increase of businesses that serve the ageing and retirement population.

I. Encourage the growth of business clusters based on similar or complementary industries.

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J. Promote business retention, expansion, and recruitment efforts that are consistent with

the town’s comprehensive plan.

K. Support existing businesses by establishing public-private partnerships.

L. Support the pursuit of local, state and federal funding and assistance that will help local

businesses become more competitive.

M. Distinguish and promote features unique to the town in order to compete and complement

the region.

N. Encourage and support home-base businesses.

Goal 3:

and transportation services that are cost effective and environmentally compatible.

Objectives:

Help provide sufficient commercial and industrial land adjacent to public facilities

A. Encourage appropriate re-use and development of older buildings.

B. Plan for areas of industrial and commercial use that will be accessible from roadways of

arterial class or higher, potentially served with utilities, and free major environmental

constraints.

C. Encourage infrastructure development and services necessary to serve new development;

well influencing the new commercial and industry to locate in the village industrial parks.

Goal 4:

and region.

Objectives:

Support the organizational growth of economic development programs in the town

A. Encourage increased cooperation between the county and surrounding areas regarding

comprehensive planning and economic development issues.

B. Support the regional efforts of the International Trade, Business and Economic

Development Council (ITBEC) for Northwest Wisconsin and the Northwest Wisconsin

Regional Planning Commission.

C. Support the efforts of the Burnett County Development Association, community

development organizations, and local chamber of commerce.

D. Promote dialogue and continue to strengthen relationships between the town and local

businesses.

E. Support programs that provide business networking opportunities to increase business

collaboration, shared resources, and to identify needs and opportunities.

Goals 5:

promote economic development.

Objectives:

Maintain the utility, communication, and transportation, infrastructure systems that

A. Work to maintain an effective and efficient government to reduce the tax burden.

B. Improve economic development opportunities along highway corridors.

C. Support the development of regional facilities, cultural amenities, and services that will

strengthen the long-term attractiveness of the town, county, and region.

D. Monitor the infrastructure needs when they are consistent with the town’s comprehensive

plan.

E. Attract and support the development of world class communication systems.

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Goals 6:

standard of living.

Objectives:

Maintain a quality workforce to strengthen existing businesses and maintain a high

A. Support local employment of area citizens, especially efforts that create opportunities for

local young adults.

B. Support home-based businesses that do not significantly increase noise, traffic, odors,

lighting, or would otherwise negatively impact the area.

C. Support area school districts, technical colleges, universities, and other non-profit

agencies that promote workforce development.

D. Support a continuum of educational opportunities responsive to the needs of the town

work place.

E. Encourage greater interaction between the schools and businesses in order to better

coordinate the required education and skills.

F. Promote and encourage community development that creates and enhances vibrant

neighborhoods, and shopping, entertainment and recreational opportunities that will

attract and retain younger families and employers.

G. Support intergovernmental efforts to development a local technical school.

6.6 Economic Development Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

ED 1. Agriculture should be supported as a vital component of the Town’s economic base.

ED 2. Forestry should be supported as a component of the Town’s economic base.

ED 3. Tourism should be supported as a vital component of the Town’s economic base.

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ED 4. Support home-based business as an economic development tool.

ED 5. Intensive commercial and industrial development should be directed toward

villages.

ED 6. Industrial development should be steered to villages capable of providing sewer and

water services.

ED 7. Highway corridor development shall be directed to designate planned commercial

areas and address building signage, lighting, service, and land use standards.

ED 8. The Town should support existing business expansion, retention efforts and new

business development efforts that are consistent with the comprehensive plan.

ED 9. Coordinate regularly with the Northwest Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission

to evaluate economic development related grants, programs, and tax incentives for

their applicability to the Town.

ED 10. Economic development programs and incentives should focus on development and

businesses that include higher quality buildings and facilities, as well as, provide

greater job opportunities with relatively high wages.

ED 11. The retention and expansion of existing businesses should be supported through

facility improvements and the implementation of increased technology.

ED 12. Continue to work with the County and Burnett County Development Association as

a resource to achieve local and regional economic development goals and

objectives.

ED 13. When evaluating substantial development proposals, the Town should consider

market interactions with the existing local and regional economy, and impacts to the

cost of providing community services. The depth of analysis required by the Town

will be appropriate for the intensity of the proposed development.

ED 14. The Town will encourage economic development through public/private

partnerships that are beneficial to the sustainability of the Town, the Region and

consistent with the comprehensive plan.

ED 15. Support the organization of apprenticeship, on-the-job training, student touring and

visitation, and student work-study programs with local industry, schools, and

government.

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6.7 Economic Development Programs

For descriptions of economic development programs potentially available to the community,

refer to the

Economic Development element of the Burnett County Inventory and Trends Report.

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7. Intergovernmental Cooperation

7.1 Intergovernmental Cooperation Plan

From cooperative road maintenance, to fire protection service districts, to shared government

buildings, Burnett County and its communities have a long history of intergovernmental

cooperation. As social, economic, and geographic pressures affect change in the Town of Wood

River, the community will increasingly look to cooperative strategies for creative and costeffective

solutions to the problems of providing public services and facilities.

Intergovernmental cooperation is any arrangement by which officials of two or more

jurisdictions coordinate plans, policies, and programs to address and resolve issues of mutual

interest. It can be as simple as communicating and sharing information, or it can involve

entering into formal intergovernmental agreements to share resources such as equipment,

buildings, staff, and revenue. Intergovernmental cooperation can even involve consolidating

services, consolidating jurisdictions, modifying community boundaries, or transferring territory.

For further detail on intergovernmental cooperation in the Town of Wood River and Burnett

County, please refer to Chapter 7 of the

The Town of Wood River’s plan for intergovernmental cooperation is to continue to rely on

intergovernmental arrangements for the efficient provision of community facilities and services,

to improve the planning and regulation of development along community boundaries, and to

continue ongoing communication with other units of government. The Town of Wood River has

been involved in intergovernmental cooperation with Burnett County and neighboring

jurisdictions for many years, but hopes to build on these past successes to accomplish even more

in the future. Top issues and opportunities identified during the planning process (refer to the

Inventory and Trends Report.

Issues and Opportunities

In order to implement the town’s plan for intergovernmental cooperation, this plan recommends

continuing to meet and plan together on a multi-jurisdictional basis. Over the long term, the

town will continue to support sharing of services and facilities where there are sustainable

benefits to town taxpayers. The town will also review opportunities to share equipment with

neighboring jurisdictions, pursue cost-sharing or purchase agreements to help drive down costs,

and review opportunities to consolidate services while maintaining service levels. Though a

boundary is not yet shared, the town may also pursue a cooperative boundary plan with the

Village of Grantsburg for the western part of the Town in the future. The town will also consider

wellhead protection as a priority when reviewing development proposals in municipal well

recharge areas.

element) include coordinating road improvements and fire protection.

7.2 Inventory of Existing Intergovernmental Agreements

The following recorded intergovernmental agreements apply to the Town of Wood River.

This agreement documents the creation of the Burnett Area Fire District. It establishes a

fire district commission and sets forth its operating procedures. The agreement

Agreement establishing Burnett Area fire district, 1999

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proportionately divides among the participating communities (based on the assessed

value of property) the responsibility for providing the fire district’s budgeted costs.

This agreement documents the town’s participation in the Burnett Regional

Recycling/Composting Center. It establishes a commission and sets forth operating

procedures. The agreement proportionately divides among the participating communities

(based on the assessed value of property) the responsibility for providing the center’s

budgeted costs.

Cooperation agreement for Burnett Regional Recycling/Composting Center, 1990

7.3 Analysis of the Relationship with School Districts and Adjacent

Local Governmental Units

School Districts

The Town of Wood River is located within the Grantsburg School District, and generally has a

good relationship with the district.

Burnett County and its communities maintain cooperative relationships with their school

districts. Partnership between communities and schools is seen in the use of school athletic

facilities that are open for use by community members.

Adjacent Local Governments

Currently, the Town of Wood River coordinates repairs on boundary roads by sharing equipment

and personnel with Towns of Daniels, Trade Lake, West Marshland, and Grantsburg.

St Croix Chippewa Tribe

Burnett County maintains a cooperative relationship with the St. Croix Tribe. The Burnett

County Human Services Division has several agreements for shared service, including providing

home delivered meals---“meals on wheels”---for members of the tribe, shared programs through

the Mental Health/Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, and joint public health preparedness

programs.

7.4 Intergovernmental Opportunities, Conflicts, and Resolutions

Intergovernmental cooperation opportunities and potential conflicts were addressed as part of the

comprehensive plan development process. The entire structure of the multi-jurisdictional

planning process was established to support improved communication between communities and

increased levels of intergovernmental coordination. Communities met together in regional

clusters to develop their comprehensive plans in a process described in Chapter 1 of the

Inventory and Trends Report

The intent of identifying the intergovernmental opportunities and conflicts shown below is to

stimulate creative thinking and problem solving over the long term. Not all of the opportunities

shown are ready for immediate action, and not all of the conflicts shown are of immediate

.

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concern. Rather, these opportunities and conflicts may further develop over the course of the

next 20 to 25 years, and this section is intended to provide community guidance at such time.

The recommendation statements found in each element of this plan specify the projects and tasks

that have been identified by the community as high priorities for action.

Opportunities

Opportunity

Potential Cooperating Units of

Government

other tools simultaneously

Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Develop plan implementation ordinances and

road maintenance and road improvement

planning

Burnett County

Assistance in rating and posting local roads for

amend the comprehensive plan

Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Utilize a coordinated process to update and

future growth, facility, and busing needs

Grantsburg School District

Work with the school district to anticipate

athletic facilities

Grantsburg School District

Share the use of school district recreational and

improvements to town hall facilities

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Seek a cooperative solution for needed

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Share excess space at the town garage Village of Grantsburg

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Share community staff Burnett County

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Opportunity

Potential Cooperating Units of

Government

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Share office equipment Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Share construction and maintenance equipment Burnett County

contracting for services such as police

protection, solid waste and recycling, recreation

programs, etc.

Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Continue to coordinate shared services and

cooperative planning

Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Reduce conflict over boundary issues through

in the Grantsburg area.

Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Develop a boundary agreement with the Village

entrance points

Burnett County

Village of Grantsburg

Town of Grantsburg

Town of West Marshland

Town of Daniels

Town of Trade Lake

Improve the attractiveness of community

Potential Conflicts and Resolutions

Potential Conflict Process to Resolve

and the Village of Grantsburg

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

Establishment of local Plan Commissions in every

Burnett County community - joint community Plan

Commission meetings

Continued meetings of the County Planning

Committee with representation from every Burnett

County community

Annexation conflicts between the town

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Potential Conflict Process to Resolve

Burnett County and the state relative to

local control of land use issues.

Adopt a local comprehensive plan

Take responsibility to develop, update, and

administer local land use ordinances and programs

Maintain communication with Burnett County on

land use issues

Provide ample opportunities for public involvement

during land use planning and ordinance development

efforts

Concern over too much intervention by

incorporated areas

Town to consider establishing an Agriculture/Urban

Interface area that prevents new farms over 500

animal units from locating within ½ mile of

incorporated areas

Burnett County to administer ACTP51 performance

standards for livestock operations over 500 animal

units

Siting of large livestock farms near

adjacent to agriculture or forestry areas

across a town boundary

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

Establishment of local Plan Commissions in every

Burnett County community - joint community Plan

Commission meetings

Continued meetings of the County Planning

Committee with representation from every Burnett

County community

Residential development planned

of Burnett County to implement the

recommendations of town plans

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

Continued meetings of the County Planning

Committee with representation from every Burnett

County community

After plan adoption, a locally driven process to

develop revisions to the county zoning and land

division ordinances

Concern over the ability or willingness

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Potential Conflict Process to Resolve

regulations from one town to the next

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

After plan adoption, a locally driven process to

develop revisions to the county zoning and land

division ordinances

Continued meetings of the County Planning

Committee with representation from every Burnett

County community

Vastly different zoning and land division

building and site design along highway

corridors, community entrance points, or

other highly visible areas

Establishment of local Plan Commissions in every

Burnett County community - joint community Plan

Commission meetings

Continued meetings of the County Planning

Committee with representation from every Burnett

County community

Cooperative design review ordinance development

and administration

Low quality commercial or industrial

between the town and the sanitary

district

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

Concern over poor communication

between the town and lake districts

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

Concern over poor communication

between the town and the school district

Distribution of plans and plan amendments to

adjacent and overlapping governments

Concern over poor communication

7.5 Intergovernmental Cooperation Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1:

town and other units of government, and the county.

Objectives:

Foster the growth of mutually beneficial intergovernmental relations between the

A. Reduce the cost and enhance the provision of coordinated or consolidated public services

and facilities with other units of government including the St. Croix Tribe.

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B. Continue the use of joint purchasing and shared service arrangements with other units of

governments where applicable to lower the unit cost of materials and supplies for such

things including, but not limited to, office supplies, roadwork supplies, vehicles,

equipment, professional services, and insurance.

C. Provide leadership for community cooperation efforts in the comprehensive plan

development, adoption, and implementation processes.

D. Encourage and facilitate the use of cooperative agreements between municipalities for

such things including but not limited to annexation, expansion of public facilities, sharing

of services and property, and land use regulation.

7.6 Intergovernmental Cooperation Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

IC 1. Transportation issues that affect the town and neighboring communities should be

jointly discussed and evaluated with that community and with the Burnett County

Highway Department and the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, if necessary.

IC 2. Where practical, the Town shall work to maintain ongoing communication and

positive relationships with the local, county, state, and federal agencies, districts, and

organizations.

IC 3. Educational efforts regarding planning, land use regulation, implementation, or

natural resources management should be discussed as multi-jurisdictional efforts

between the Town, neighboring communities, the County, and WDNR.

IC 4. Town facilities that have available capacity shall be considered for joint use with

other units of government or community organizations.

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IC 5. The Town shall consider intergovernmental and other cooperative options before

establishing, reinstating, expanding, constructing or rehabilitating community

facilities, utilities or services.

IC 6. The Town shall support the consolidation or shared provision of public services

where the desired level of service can be maintained; where the public supports such

action, and where sustainable cost savings can be realized.

IC 7. Annually review intergovernmental agreements for their effectiveness and efficiency.

IC 8. Continue cooperative planning efforts with surrounding communities, districts,

associations, service providers and the County.

IC 9. Before the purchase of new Town facilities or equipment or the re-instatement of

service agreements, the Town will pursue options for trading, renting, sharing, or

contracting such items from neighboring jurisdictions, where applicable.

IC 10. Opportunities for sharing Town staff or contracting out existing staff availability will

be pursued should the opportunity arise.

IC 11. Where applicable the Town shall encourage cooperative boundary plans with

neighboring towns in compliance with Wis. Stats. 66.0307.

7.7 Intergovernmental Cooperation Programs

For descriptions of intergovernmental cooperation programs potentially available to the

community, refer to the

Inventory and Trends Report

Intergovernmental Cooperation element of the Burnett County.

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8. Land Use

8.1 Introduction

Land use is central to the process of comprehensive planning and includes both an assessment of

existing conditions and a plan for the future. Land use is integrated with all elements of the

comprehensive planning process. Changes in land use are not isolated, but rather are often the

end result of a change in another element. For example, development patterns evolve over time

as a result of population growth, the development of new housing, the development of new

commercial or industrial sites, the extension of utilities or services, or the construction of a new

road.

This chapter of the comprehensive plan includes local information for both existing and planned

land use in the Town of Wood River. For further detail on existing land use in Burnett County,

please refer to Chapter 8 of the

Inventory and Trends Report.

8.2 Existing Land Use

Evaluating land use entails broadly classifying how land is presently used. Each type of land use

has its own characteristics that can determine compatibility, location, and preference relative to

other land uses. Land use analysis then proceeds by assessing the community development

impacts of land ownership patterns, land management programs, and the market forces that drive

development. Mapping data are essential to the process of analyzing existing development

patterns, and will serve as the framework for formulating how land will be used in the future.

Map 8-1, Table 8-1, and Figure 8-1 together provide the picture of existing land use for the

Town of Wood River.

Table 8-1

Existing Land Use, Town of Wood River, 2008

Land Use Classification Acres Percent of Total

Residential 1 ,408 6.2%

Commercial 3 0 0.1%

Industrial 1 83 0.8%

Agricultural 9 ,453 41.4%

Forest / Open Space 1 0,152 44.5%

Tribal Land - 0.0%

Surface Water 1 ,193 5.2%

Roads 3 92 1.7%

Total 22,811 100.0%

Source: Burnett County, Wisconsin Department of Revenue (2007 Statement of

Assessments as Reported on or Before 3-04-08), and Foth.

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December 2009 Draft

8-2 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Figure 8-1

Existing Land Use, Town of Wood River, 2008

Forest / Open Space

44.5%

Agricultural

41.4%

Industrial

0.8%

Commercial

0.1%

Residential

6.2%

Roads

1.7%

Surface Water

5.2%

Source: Burnett County, Wisconsin Department of Revenue (2007 Statement of Assessments as Reported on or

Before 3-04-08), and Foth.

Burnett County,

Wisconsin

EXISTING LAND USE

TOWN OF WOOD RIVER

This drawing is neither a legally recorded map nor a survey and is

not intended to be used as one. This drawing is a compilation of

records, information and data used for reference purposes only.

Source: Wisconsin DOT and Burnett Co Land Information Office

X:/GB/IE/2008/08B042/GIS/mxd/exlu/burnett_co_wood_river_exlu.mxd

December 10, 2009 Drawn by: DAT Checked by: JDW

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BLAINE

SWISS

RUSK

SIREN

UNION

ANDERSON

SCOTT

DANIELS DEWEY

LINCOLN MEENON

WEST MARSHLAND

OAKLAND JACKSON

SAND LAKE

WEBB LAKE

LA FOLLETTE

TRADE LAKE ROOSEVELT

GRANTSBURG WOOD RIVER

Burnett County

MAP 8 - 1

Legend

State Highway

Existing Land Use

County Highway

Town Road

Rivers

Lakes

Wetlands

Village Boundary

Town Boundary

County Boundary

Single Family Residential

Multi Family Residential

Commercial

Industrial

Government/Institutional/Utilities

Agriculture

Forests and Open Space

Parks and Recreation

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8-4 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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8-5

The Town of Wood River, with about 22,811 acres, is roughly the size of a typical 36-section

town. The town’s development pattern is diverse as influenced primarily by soil conditions. The

Town of Wood River is still primarily an undeveloped, rural town, and passive land uses include

about 91% of the town’s landscape. Forest/open space is the single largest existing land use at

10,152 acres (44.5%), while agricultural uses comprise about 9,453 acres (41.4%).

Developed uses make up just fewer than 9% of the town’s landscape including residential,

commercial and roads. Residential is the single largest developed land use at 1,408 acres, and is

dispersed throughout the town with notable concentrations of housing surrounding the town’s

lakes, rivers and along/near roads.

Of note is a trend toward the conversion of seasonal homes along the town’s lakeshores to larger,

year-round homes. Recent development in the town has been primarily residential, as new

commercial and manufacturing development has a tendency to generally locate within the three

Burnett County Villages.

Other intensive uses present in the town include small amounts of commercial use. The majority

of these uses are found in the rural hamlets of Alpha and Falun. These mixed use area are a

distinguishing feature of the town and serves as town centers.

8.3 Land Ownership and Management

Land ownership and management is comprised of several components that significantly affect

land use. The type of land ownership (public, private, land trust, etc.) has a direct impact on how

property is managed and how lands may be used in the future. Public ownership of land in

Burnett County consists of municipal, county, and state owned lands. As land management takes

place under both private and public ownership, resource management programs may prescribe

certain requirements and limitations that affect how lands may be used in the future. Voluntary

land and resource management protection programs with significant utilization on private lands

in Burnett County include Managed Forest Land (MFL) and Forest Crop Land (FCL). Table 8-2

below shows land ownership and management in the Town of Wood River.

Understanding land ownership and management patterns provides a link to a host of voluntary

and non-regulatory plan implementation tools. Valued community features and resources can be

protected for future generations not only through regulatory approaches like zoning and land

division ordinances, but also through public ownership or programs like MFL and FCL. Burnett

County will be best positioned to achieve its desired future when land use, land management,

and land regulation are working in concert.

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December 2009 Draft

8-6 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Table 8-2

Land Ownership and Management

Acreage

Percent of

Total

County Lands 0.0 0.0%

Federal Lands 0.0 0.0%

State Land 900.2 3.9%

Tribal Lands 0.0 0.0%

Private Managed Forest Crop Land and

Forest Land 0.0 0.0%

Land Not Under State, Federal, County,

Tribal or Private Agricultural Ownership and

Management 21,910.8 96.1%

Total Town Acreage 22,811.0 100.0%

Source: Burnett County

8.4 Projected Supply and Demand of Land Uses

Table 8-3 includes estimates for the total acreage that will be utilized by residential, agriculture,

commercial, manufacturing, and forest/open space land uses in five-year increments through

2030. These future land use demand estimates are largely dependent on population projections

and should only be utilized for planning purposes in combination with other indicators of land

use demand.

The housing unit projection approximates the number of new residential units for the residential

land demand projection, and is based on averaging the population projections (using both the

WDOA and linear projection methods). Refer to the

details on population projections. Using the population projections, seasonal and vacant housing

percentages, and average persons per household in the town, the housing unit projections are

calculated. Using this method, a total of 41 new homes between 2008 and 2030 are projected in

the town. The residential land use demand projection then assumes that each new home will

occupy an average area of 2.4 acres. This existing average acreage is calculated by dividing the

total residential assessed land by the total number of housing units (This plan actually specifies a

range of residential lot sizes and densities within the Future Land Use Management Areas

outlined in Section 8.8, the existing average is only for estimating purposes). This equates to an

additional 99 residential acres by the year 2030.

Projected demand for commercial and industrial land use assumes that the ratio of the town’s

population to land area in these categories will remain the same in the future. In other words,

each person will require the same amount of land for each particular land use as he or she does

today. These land use demand projections also rely on averaging the population projections.

Refer to the

equates an additional 2 acres for commercial use and an additional 13 acres for industrial use by

the year 2030.

Population and Housing element for morePopulation and Housing element for more details on population projections. This

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8-7

Projected agriculture and forest/open space use acreages are calculated based on the assumption

that these uses will decrease over time. Agriculture, woodlots, and other open land are the

existing land uses that are converted to other uses to accommodate new development. The

amount of agriculture and forest/open space land consumed in each five-year increment is based

on the average amount of land use demand for each of the developed uses by the year 2030. In

other words, a total of 114 acres is projected to be consumed by residential, commercial, and

industrial development in the Town of Wood River between 2008 and 2030, so agriculture and

forest/open space lands are reduced by the same number within the same time period. This

number is subtracted proportionally from both of these land uses based on the 2008 ratio of each.

Table 8-3

Projected Land Use Demand (acres)

Town of Wood River 2008-2030

2008 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030

Estimate Projections Projections Projections Projections Projections Change %

Residential

1,408 1,423 1,451 1,477 1,496 1,507 99 7%

Commercial

30 30 31 31 32 32 2 7%

Industrial

183 185 189 192 194 196 13 0%

Agricultural

9,453 9,445 9,429 9,415 9,404 9,398 -55 -1%

Forest/ Open Space

10,152 10,143 10,126 10,111 10,100 10,093 -59 -1%

Other (Roads and Surface

Water)

1,585 1,585 1,585 1,585 1,585 1,585 0 0%

Total Town Acreage

2 2,811 22,811 22,811 22,811 22,811 22,811

2008-2030

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, WDOA, and Foth

Table 8-4 provides a comparison of land supply and demand for the Town of Wood River. Land

use demand is based on the previous calculations, and land supply is based on the future land use

plan described in Section 8.7.

Table 8-4

Land Supply and Demand Comparison

Town of Wood River

Residential Commercial Industrial

Existing Land Use 1,408 30 183

2030 Land Use Projection

(Demand)

Future Land Use (Supply)

1 1,507 32 1962 5,033 575 123

1

housing projections.

Amount of land projected to be needed in the year 2030 to meet demand based on population and

2

for the composition of the Land Use Management Areas (LUMAs) included in the following table.

The composition of the type of use (i.e. 2% of commercial use within the Rural Residential LUMA)

was determined by an evaluation of the existing development pattern and the presumption that

commercial and industrial opportunities may become available on a case by case basis that the plan

accommodates.

The supply of land for future residential, commercial, and industrial is based on general assumptions

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December 2009 Draft

8-8 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

LUMA Residential Commercial Industrial

Rural Residential 98% 2% -

Shoreland Residential 98% 2% -

Agriculture 10% 2% 0.5%

Rural Mixed Use Hamlet 45% 45% 10%

A sufficient supply of residential land has been planned through 2030 and beyond within the

Future Land Use Management Areas based on the projected residential demand. Important to

note is that while the Future Land Use Management Areas allow the potential for a significant

amount of residential development across the town, the actual amount of development will be

limited by demand (which also applies to other uses). In addition, residential development will

be managed in accordance with the Future Land Use Management Areas outlined in Section 8.8.

There is also a sufficient supply of commercial land available within the town through several of

the Land Use Management Areas. The primary designated location for commercial development

is located in the Rural Mixed Use/Hamlet (RMU) Management Area. Commercial land demand

may also be met in other parts of the town within the Shoreland Residential (SR) area that allows

limited compatible commercial uses, through home based businesses if compatible within the

town’s rural and residential areas, and limited within the Rural Residential (RR) and Agriculture

(A) LUMAs based on intensity of the proposed use and compatibility with surrounding

development. Industrial uses can also be accommodated within RMU Management Area and

through home based businesses if compatible within the town’s rural and residential areas. The

future land use shows less industrial supply than the projected demand; however, this demand

can easily be met if necessary depending on the actual composition of the RMU area in the

future.

8.5 Density Management - A Different Approach to Managing

Development

Burnett County manages growth through a zoning code that generally regulates the types of uses

allowed and the associated minimum lot sizes that are required. This Plan and the County Plan

advocates an approach to establish certain maximum densities for development within some of

the planned rural and use designations as managed by Burnett County ordinances. Specific

recommendations are included within the Future Land Use Management Areas outlined in

Section 8.8.

It is critical to understand the difference between how density is used to manage development in

comparison to minimum lot size. Minimum lot size requirements set how big individual lots

need to be. Maximum density requirements set how many new homes or lots can be divided

from a larger parcel, regardless of how big individual home sites or lots need to be. Establishing

density standards typically works in conjunction with minimum lot sizes (and sometimes

maximum lot sizes) to ensure the goals of the area (such as very low density in the agriculture

classification) are met while ensuring standards are applied for health and safety (minimum lot

size areas for adequate septage treatment and replacement). For more information refer to the

Burnett County Comprehensive Plan

.

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8-9

8.6 Cluster/Conservation Development

In concert with adding density management provisions to achieve town and county goals of

farmland preservation and maintaining rural character, the town and county should also consider

adding residential clustering/conservation provisions as a primary development option for rural

land development. Clustering typically allows relatively small residential lots, but still large

enough to ensure adequate septage treatment and replacement systems. Clustering residential

lots on a portion of a development tract (in conjunction with density management) allows a

number of benefits including the conservation of farmland, forest, open space and natural

resources, the ability to place home sites where the most suitable soils exist, and the potential for

lower infrastructure costs. For more information refer to the Burnett County Comprehensive

Plan. The following images show the difference between conventional residential lot

development and cluster/conservation development:

Conventional Cluster/Conservation

8.7 Future Land Use Plan

The future land use plan is one of the central components of the comprehensive plan that can be

used as a guide for local officials when considering community development and redevelopment

proposals. When considering the role of the future land use plan in community decision making,

it is important to keep the following characteristics in mind.

the community.

A land use plan is an expression of a preferred or ideal future – a vision for the future of

statutes that are separate from those that govern planning. And while it may make sense

to match portions of the land use plan map with the zoning map immediately after plan

A land use plan is not the same as zoning. Zoning is authorized and governed by a set of

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December 2009 Draft

8-10 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

adoption, other portions of the zoning map may achieve consistency with the land use

plan incrementally over time.

through a number of fiscal tools, regulatory tools, and non-regulatory tools including

voluntary land management and community development programs.

A land use plan is not implemented exclusively through zoning. It can be implemented

remains applicable to changing trends and conditions. The plan is not static. It can be

amended when a situation arises that was not anticipated during the initial plan

development process.

A land use plan is long range and will need to be reevaluated periodically to ensure that it

vision may take the full 20 to 25 years to materialize, while some components may never

come to fruition within the planning period.

The primary components of the future land use plan include the Future Land Use Map (Map 8-2)

and the Future Land Use Management Areas. These components work together with the

Implementation element to provide policy guidance for decision makers in the town.

The Town of Wood River’s plan for future land use is intended to protect agricultural, natural,

and cultural resources for future generations while also allowing reasonable opportunities for

land development and making efficient use of existing infrastructure. The town will accomplish

this by managing the use of lands and the density of development. Most locations in the town

will allow for development to take place, but the density of development will be planned in order

to preserve valued features of the landscape and to encourage growth in areas that are most

suitable for development.

The future land use plan was shaped by both objective data and local opinion. Public

participation in the form of public meetings and a county-wide survey was utilized to

significantly impact the outcome. The town considered the locations of natural resources,

agriculture, roads, current land use patterns, land ownership patterns, and other objective factors

to measure suitability of lands for various future land uses

reviewed by the public. Changes to the draft plan suggested by the town citizens were evaluated

by the planning commission, and the Town Board, and any accepted changes were incorporated

into the plan.

A land use plan is neither a prediction nor a guaranty. Some components of the future. A draft map was prepared that was

This drawing is neither a legally recorded map nor a survey and is

not intended to be used as one. This drawing is a compilation of

records, information and data used for reference purposes only.

Source: Wisconsin DOT and Burnett Co Land Information Office

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BLAINE

SWISS

RUSK

SIREN

UNION

ANDERSON

SCOTT

DANIELS DEWEY

LINCOLN MEENON

WEST MARSHLAND

OAKLAND JACKSON

SAND LAKE

WEBB LAKE

LA FOLLETTE

TRADE LAKE ROOSEVELT

GRANTSBURG WOOD RIVER

Burnett County

Burnett County,

Wisconsin

FUTURE LAND USE

TOWN OF WOOD RIVER

MAP 8 - 2

Legend

Base Layers

PLSS Sections

Village Boundary

Town Boundary

Wetlands

State Highway

County Highway

Town Road

Rivers

Lakes

County Boundary



Lakes - 300'

Rivers - 300', Lakes - 1000'

911 Structures

Land Use Management Areas

Shoreland Residential

Rural Residential

Planned Urban Transition

Rural Mixed Use/Hamlet

Forestry Residential and Recreation

Public Resource

Agricultural

General Commercial

Industrial

Government/Institutional

Native American Land

Agriculture/Forestry/Residential

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8-12 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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8-13

8.8 Future Land Use Management Areas

The following Future Land Use Management Areas (LUMAs) have been utilized on the town’s

Future Land Use Map. These descriptions give meaning to the map by describing (as applicable)

the purpose, primary goal, preferred development density, preferred uses, and discouraged uses

for each management area. They may also include policy statements that are specific to areas of

the community mapped under a particular LUMA. Any such policies carry the same weight and

serve the same function as policies found elsewhere in this plan.

Agriculture (A)

consistent with agriculture while optimizing agricultural production areas. The purpose is

also to implement comprehensive plan goals by encouraging livestock and other

agricultural uses in areas where soil and other conditions are best suited to these

agricultural pursuits. This area provides consistency with the County designated

farmland preservation areas and establishes the farm and woodlands character of this part

of the Town and County.

Purpose: To prevent the conversion of agricultural land to other uses that are not

management area is intended to maintain a viable agricultural base to support the

agricultural processing and service industries, help control public service costs in rural

areas thereby avoiding the need to extend urban services to scattered, isolated residential

areas, help to preserve productive soils, and help to maintain the scenic beauty, rural

character, and cultural heritage of the community.

Primary Goal: To preserve and promote a full range of agricultural uses. In addition, this

include livestock production, dairy, agriculturally-related residences, greenhouses, horse

facilities, agriculture sales and service, agricultural storage, agricultural research and

development, fish and wildlife management activities, timber harvest and milling, and

aqua culture. Sand and gravel extraction and home based businesses would be permitted

in accordance with county regulations governing such activity. The Agriculture

Management Area could include a limited amount of residential development at various

levels of density, but the predominant land use would be agricultural in nature.

Preferred Use: All agricultural uses, regardless of size. Specific preferred uses could

Recommended Policies:

The preferred housing density should be a maximum of 1 unit per 40 acres.

development should be placed on the landscape in a fashion that prevents conflicts

between agricultural and residential land uses.

In areas identified with the Agriculture Management Area, new non-farm residential

mapped Agriculture areas.

Promote clustering of homes and preservation of land for open space use within

enough to accommodate development (say one acre) and yet small enough not to

consume prime agricultural lands (say 3 or 5 acres).

Utilize maximum and minimum lot size provisions to ensure the lots created are large

prime soils in production as possible.

Consider soil characteristics when siting new buildings to maintain as much of the

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December 2009 Draft

8-14 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

that does not detract from the area’s rural character, and which may be easily served

by town, county, and emergency services.

Encourage new development that is allowed in Agriculture to be located in a manner

Rural Residential (RR)

limited residential uses. Rural residential activity has been significant as the off lake

property becomes more in demand for seasonal use. This area includes marginal or

abandoned farmlands that have become attractive for rural residences.

Purpose: To maintain the rural and open character of these areas while accommodating

of the area, while accommodating limited residential development. Promote infill of

areas which have already experienced development in order to increase overall density

without sacrificing community character.

Primary Goal: Preserve agriculture, the rural landscape, open space, and natural features

development generally located along existing roadways, in clusters, and on larger lots

than found in an urban area. Commercial uses are discouraged except those of very low

intensity such as golf courses or home-based businesses.

Preferred Use: Agricultural uses, with some size limitations. Limited residential

Recommended Policies:

The preferred housing density should be a maximum of 1 unit per 10 acres.

Lots smaller than one acre should be allowed with conservation or cluster design.

Density bonuses for conservation or cluster design should be considered.

Shoreland Residential (SR)

County as areas historically prone to development pressure. Many of the shorelands are

significantly developed with both full-time and seasonal residents. Further residential

development is regulated by the lakes and rivers classification development standards and

accompanying shoreland ordinances.

Purpose: To recognize the shore lands adjacent to lakes, rivers, and streams in Burnett

development of these areas that address: ensuring environmental quality, maintaining

views and open space, maintaining community character, and potential recreational

activity conflicts.

Primary Goal: Establishing appropriate strategies for the management of future

Limited commercial uses including lodging, resorts and associated retail and services

should be compatible with immediate surroundings and located in areas of established

commercial uses.

Preferred Use: Residential uses that are compatible with their immediate surroundings.

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8-15

lot size and density:

Recommended Policies: Stay consistent with Lakes Classification strategy for minimum

Class 1 Lake: 30,000 SF lot

Class 2 Lake: 40,000 SF lot

Class 3 Lake, River, or Stream: 75,000 SF lot

Rural Mixed-Use Hamlet (RMU)

Lake as small growth areas that have historically been crossroad communities that

provide convenience and rural retail services to farm and lake recreation areas.

Purpose: To recognize the places of A&H, Alpha, Danbury, Falun, Hertel, and Webb

exist such as the sewer services area in Danbury) of these areas in a fashion that

strengthens the existing identity and character.

Primary Goal: To maintain and allow the limited growth (except where urban services

densities in accordance with the type of use. The density, layout, and design of

development shall compatible with surrounding uses and character with a maximum

residential density of 1 unit per ¾ acre.

Preferred Uses: A mix of residential and commercial uses could be allowed at varying

without public sewage service, the maximum density should be one home per threequarter

acre. For areas with public sewage, the minimum density should be one unit per

acre.

Recommended Policies: Densities and lot sizes should be allowed to vary. For areas

Public Resources (PR)

that are not planned for development.

Purpose: A Land Use Management Area to designate existing public lands and wetlands

these features for future generations. In addition, to prohibit developments in areas

which are not suited.

Primary Goal: To maintain natural features and areas as community assets and conserve

protection activities, and fisheries as possible uses.

Table 8-5 and Figure 8-2 display the distribution of each Future Land Use Management Area as

shown on the Future Land Use Map.

Preferred Use: Allowable uses may include forestry, passive recreation, wildlife

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December 2009 Draft

8-16 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Table 8-5

Future Land Use, Town of Wood River 2030

Future Land Use Management Area Acres Percentage of Total

Agriculture 17,533.9 76.9%

Rural Residential 1,845.9 8.1%

Shoreland Residential 1,336.6 5.9%

Rural Mixed Use Hamlet 356.6 1.6%

Public Resource 625.3 2.7%

Water 1,112.6 4.9%

Total 22,810.9 100.0%

Source: Town of Wood River.

Figure 8-2

Future Land Use, Town of Wood River 2030

Agriculture

76.9%

Water

4.9%

Rural Residential

8.1%

Shoreland

Residential

5.9%

Public Resource

2.7%

Rural Mixed Use

Hamlet

1.6%

Source: Town of Wood River

8.9 Existing and Potential Land Use Conflicts

The following existing and potential unresolved land use conflicts have been identified by the

Town of Wood River. While the multi-jurisdictional planning process was designed to provide

maximum opportunities for the resolution of both internal and external land use conflicts, some

issues may remain. Due to their complexity, the long range nature of comprehensive planning,

and the uncertainty of related assumptions, these conflicts remain unresolved and should be

monitored during plan implementation.

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8-17

Existing Land Use Conflicts

Lack of property and building maintenance.

Lack of land use ordinance enforcement.

Telecommunication towers.

right-to-farm.

Residential development next to high intensity agricultural land use and threats to the

Poorly designed or unattractive commercial or industrial development.

Lack of screening or buffering between incompatible uses.

industrial uses.

Home based businesses that take on the characteristics of primary commercial or

The over-consumption of rural lands by large lot subdivisions.

The loss of rural character in some locations.

Potential Land Use Conflicts

and development of implementation tools.

Siting of undesirable or poorly designed land uses in the interim between plan adoption

Annexation conflicts may arise with the Village.

Meeting the service needs of newly developed areas.

Controlling and managing development along major highway corridors.

The over-consumption of rural lands by large lot subdivisions.

The loss of rural character in some locations.

8.10 Opportunities for Redevelopment

In every instance where development is considered in the

Comprehensive Plan

development is the primary type of redevelopment that is likely in the town. In particular, infill

opportunities are possible with respect to the RR, SR, and RCM Future Land Use Management

Areas.

Town of Wood River Year 2030, redevelopment is also considered as an equally valid option. Infill

8.11 Land Use Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1:

recognition of resource limitations and town goals and objectives.

Objectives:

Guide the efficient use of land through a unified vision of planned growth in

A. Maintain a current, long-range comprehensive plan, which will serve as a guide for future

land use and zoning decisions.

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8-18 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

B. Develop procedures and policies that ensure a balance between appropriate land use and

the rights of property owners, focusing on the best interests of the town as a whole.

C. Ensure all landowners have equitable options for proposing land use change.

D. Coordinate land use planning and growth management throughout the town to facilitate

efficient resource investments while allowing for local autonomy where warranted.

E. Help identify, evaluate, and preserve historic, archaeological, and cultural resources.

F. Encourage town planning goals that are specific to the town goals and policies.

G. Identify areas of potential conflict between the land use plans of the Town, surrounding

communities, and the county and provide a process for the discussion and resolution of

such conflicts.

H. Establish agreements regarding land use regulation and provision of services in the

growth areas outside existing villages addressing land uses, levels of service, resolution

of boundary disputes, service extension policies, and transfer of jurisdictional burdens.

Goal 2:

town’s goals and objectives for the future.

Objectives:

Plan for a desirable pattern of land use that contributes to the realization of the

A. Restrict new development from areas shown to be unsafe or unsuitable for development

due to natural hazards, contamination, access, or incompatibility problems.

B. Establish a range of preferred land use classifications and a range of preferred

development densities and assign them to areas of the town in order to identify planning

guidelines within which a variety of local land use planning and implementation options

will achieve long term land use compatibility.

C. Seek a pattern of land use that will preserve large tracts of productive agricultural areas

and resources.

D. Seek a pattern of land use that will preserve productive forestry areas and resources.

E. Seek a pattern of land use that will preserve green spaces in developed areas, and natural

resources, with a focus on ground water and surface water resources.

F. Seek a pattern of land use that will maintain and enhance the town economy.

G. Focus areas of substantial new growth within or near existing areas of development

where adequate public facilities and services can be cost-effectively provided or

expanded.

H. Promote growth patterns that result in compact, distinct and separate communities rather

than continuous linear strips of development.

I. Encourage cluster development to assure conservation of land, efficient provision of

public services, and accessibility.

J. Encourage new development to be integrated with the surrounding landscape through

visual prominence of natural features, use of natural materials and colors, and minimizing

the development’s impact on the natural environment.

K. Help promote the provision of public facilities and services when sufficient need and

revenue base to support them exits.

L. Consider a variety of planning tools such as area development plans, density management

regulations, purchase or transfer of development rights programs, site and architectural

design review guidelines, and voluntary land management programs to achieve the

town’s desired pattern of future land use.

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M. Encourage land division layouts that incorporate the preservation of valued community

features, that fit within the character of the local community, and that are suited to the

specific location in which the development is proposed.

N. Require landscape and land use buffers to lessen the impacts of conflicting land uses in

close proximity.

O. Require intensive uses such as salvage yards to be reviewed and permitted by the

township.

P. Coordinate with the County, Department of Natural Resources, and the National Park

Service where applicable to ensure that land management decisions provide maximum

benefits.

Q. Review land use maps, surveys and public meetings for inclusion in the land use

ordinances.

8.12 Land Use Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

LU 1. The comprehensive plan shall identify anticipated areas for future growth, the

preferred land uses within growth areas, and policies that guide the review of

proposed developments.

LU 2. Work with the county to improve land division ordinance provisions toward

improved management of land use, development, and toward overall comprehensive

plan implementation.

LU 3. Work with the County to update land use management tools as necessary to

implement the Preferred Land Use Plan.

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LU 4. All development proposals shall meet the intent of the Preferred Land Use

Management Areas as described within the Land Use element.

LU 5. Provide the county input and recommendations prior to a rezoning, conditional use,

land division (including plats and certified survey maps), or site plan approval.

LU 6. Where a proposed development is found to be inconsistent with comprehensive plan

policies, an applicant shall be advised to petition the local unit of government for a

revision to the comprehensive plan preferred land use map (note: the applicant may

also revise the design of the proposed development to attempt to achieve consistency

with the plan).

LU 7. The Town should review and approve growth and development applications to

address service demands on community services or facilities.

LU 8. At a minimum, the following characteristics shall be used to define a cluster or

conservation design development:

a) Residential lots or building sites are concentrated and grouped.

b) The number of lots (density) takes into account the standards of the overlying

zoning district.

c) The lot size is reduced from what is normally required.

d) A maximum lot size is employed to support open space requirements and manage

density.

e) There are residual lands that are preserved as green space in perpetuity for the

purpose of limiting density, protecting valued community features such as

agriculture, natural resources, or cultural resources.

LU 9. Home-based business shall maintain the following characteristics:

a) They maintain compliance with the specific requirements of the Town ordinance

b) They are a secondary use of a primarily residential property.

c) They have little to no outward appearance or negative impact on the surrounding

neighborhood.

LU 10. At such time that a home-based business takes on the characteristics of a primary

commercial or industrial use, it shall be relocated, discontinued, or rezoned (as

necessary) to be consistent with the applicable adopted comprehensive plan and

overlying land use regulation (zoning) to appropriately reflect the commercial or

industrial use.

LU 11. Proposed conditional uses shall meet the following criteria in order to gain Town

approval:

a) Complies with the requirements of the applicable zoning district

b) Use and density are consistent with the intent, purpose, and policies of the

applicable preferred land use classification

c) Use and site design are compatible with adjacent uses in terms of aesthetics, scale,

hours of operation, traffic generation, lighting, noise, odor, dust, vibration, and

other external impacts

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d) Does not diminish property values in the surrounding neighborhood

e) Provides assurance of continuing maintenance

f) Addresses parking and site layout requirements

LU 12. Assess the need for the development of a Town ordinance regulating the storage of

non functioning vehicles, junk, scrap and related “eye-sore”.

LU 13. Insure that existing land use activities currently in the Town are “grand-fathered” in

to any new regulatory practice.

LU 14. If consistent with the Town’s comprehensive plan, the design of new commercial

development should employ shared driveway access, shared parking areas, shared

internal traffic circulation, and coordinated site planning with adjacent businesses as

warranted.

LU 15. New commercial and industrial development should employ site and building designs

that include:

a) Future business and industrial development in the Town will be reviewed for

potential financial, service and visual impacts to surrounding landowners.

b) Industrial development will be encouraged to relocate to industrial parks in the

incorporated villages.

8.13 Land Use Programs

For descriptions of land use programs potentially available to the community, refer to the

Use

Landelement of the Burnett County Inventory and Trends Report.

Existing Plans

The Town of Wood River actively utilizes land use programs and has developed the following

related strategic plans:

Additional Programs

The following Burnett County programs are identified here, because implementation of the

Town of Wood River’s land use plan will require continued cooperation with the county.

Revisions to the county zoning and land division ordinances are a likely outgrowth of the

comprehensive planning process, which has also been identified as an intergovernmental

cooperation opportunity in Section 7.4. Tracking development density over time, as is suggested

in the Future Land Use Management Areas, will require cooperation with county land

information systems.

Burnett County Zoning Department

The Burnett County Zoning Department provides zoning administration, issues zoning and land

use permits, and houses information and maps of zoning districts, floodplains, shorelands, and

wetlands. The Zoning Department issues all Sanitary Permits for the county and inspects all

systems for compliance with state codes. The department also administers the Wisconsin Fund

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Grant Program which provides funding assistance for failing private sanitary systems. It also

enforces a Subdivision Ordinance which regulates division of land parcels.

Burnett County Land Information Office

The Land Information Office was established within the Property Listing Office and is under the

direction of the Land Information Office Coordinator. The coordinator's responsibilities include

assuring the efficient integration of the land information system and the cooperation between

federal and state Agencies, local governmental units, county departments, public and private

utilities and the private sector

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9. Implementation

9.1 Action Plan

In order for plans to be meaningful, they must be implemented, so the Town of Wood River’s

comprehensive plan was developed with implementation in mind. Not only can useful policy

guidance for local decision making be found in each planning element, but an action plan is also

provided containing specific programs and recommended actions.

An action plan is intended to jump start the implementation process and to provide continued

focus over the long term. During the comprehensive planning process, a detailed framework for

implementation was created which will serve to guide the many steps that must be taken to put

the plan in motion. This action plan outlines those steps and recommends a timeline for their

completion. Further detail on each task can be found in the policies and recommendations of the

related planning element as noted in the

identified in the following four areas:

Task statement. Recommended actions have been

Plan Adoption and Update Actions

Intergovernmental Cooperation Actions

Ordinance Development and Update Actions

The recommended actions are listed in priority order within each of the four implementation

areas as noted in the

medium and long term actions, and ongoing or periodic actions are listed last.

Strategic Planning ActionsTiming component. Highest priority actions are listed first, followed by

Plan Adoption and Update Actions

Priority (Short Term) Actions

1. Task: Pass a resolution recommending adoption of the comprehensive plan by the Town

Board (

Responsible Party: Plan Commission

Timing: November 2009 – February, 2010

2. Task: Adopt the comprehensive plan by ordinance (

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: February – March, 2010

Periodic Actions

1. Task: Review the comprehensive plan for performance in conjunction with the budgeting

process (

Responsible Party: Plan Commission

Timing: Annually

Implementation element).Implementation element).Implementation element).

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2. Task: Conduct a comprehensive plan update (

Responsible Party: Plan Commission, Town Board

Timing: Every five years

Consideration: The 2010 census data will be available in 2011. The updated housing and

population counts and projections can be applied and planning documents modified based

on the new data.

Implementation element).

Intergovernmental Cooperation Actions

Priority (Short Term) Actions

1. Task: Meet with other units of local government to assess/discuss plan review issues,

implementation coordination, and consistency requirements (

Cooperation

Intergovernmentalelement).

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: 2010/2011 (within one to two years)

Medium Term Actions

1. Task: Distribute an intergovernmental cooperation update (

Cooperation

Intergovernmentalelement).

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: 2012 to 2015 (within three to five years)

2. Task: Review and evaluate existing intergovernmental agreements and services

(

Intergovernmental Cooperation element).

Responsible Party: Plan Commission and Town Board

Timing: 2012 to 2015 (within three to five years)

Long Term Actions

1. Task: Work with Burnett County to create a Purchase of Development Rights PDR

Program or Donated Easement Program (

Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources

element).

Responsible Party: Plan Commission and Town Board

Timing: 2014 (five years or more)

Periodic Actions

1. Task: Utilize intergovernmental options to provide needed service and facility

improvements.

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: Ongoing

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Ordinance Development and Update Actions

Short Term Actions

1. Task: Work with Burnett County to modify the zoning ordinance and map toward

implementation of the town’s comprehensive plan (

Community Facilities; Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources; Land Use

Transportation; Utilities and

element).

Responsible Party: Plan Commission and Town Board

Timing: Anticipated late 2010 - 2012

2. Task: Work with Burnett County to modify the county land division ordinance toward

implementation of the town’s comprehensive plan (

Community Facilities; Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources; Land Use

Transportation; Utilities and

element).

Responsible Party: Plan Commission and Town Board

Timing: Anticipated late 2010 - 2012

Medium Term Actions

1. Task: Develop a site plan and architectural design review standards. The standards could

be guidelines or an ordinance. Related provisions may be developed at the county level

which may apply, therefore it is recommended the town work with Burnett County within

the construct of the county zoning and land division ordinance updates prior to pursuing

this strategy (

Responsible Party: Plan Commission and Town Board

Timing: 2012 to 2014 (within three to five years)

Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources element).

Long Term Actions

1. Task: Consider development of a historic preservation ordinance (

and Cultural Resources

Responsible Party: Plan Commission and Town Board

Timing: 2015 (five years or more)

Agricultural, Natural,element).

Periodic Actions

1. Task: Update the town road construction specifications (

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: Periodic as needed

Transportation element).

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Strategic Planning Actions

Periodic Actions

1. Task: Review land use and density policies for residential development to ensure longer

term plan recommendations are coordinated with shorter term market conditions

(

Responsible Party: Plan Commission

Timing: Annually

2. Task: Review ordinances and fees for their impacts on town administration and

development applicants (

Responsible Party: Plan Commission

Timing: Annually

3. Task: Update the five-year road improvement plan (

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: Annually

4. Task: Pursue funding for transportation improvements (

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: Annually

5. Task: Assess staffing, training, and equipment needs (

Housing element).Housing element).Transportation element).Transportation element).Utilities and Community Facilities

element).

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: Annually

6. Task: Assess building and public facility capacity (

Utilities and Community Facilities

element).

Responsible Party: Town Board

Timing: Every five years

7. Task: Maintain an inventory of active farms, feedlots, and manure storage facilities

(

Responsible Party: Plan Commission

Timing: As needed

8. Task: Maintain an inventory of historic and archeological sites (

and Cultural Resources

Responsible Party: Plan Commission

Timing: As needed

Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources element).Agricultural, Natural,element).

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9.2 Status and Changes to Land Use Programs and Regulations

The following provides an inventory of the land use regulations that are in affect in the Town of

Wood River and summarizes recommended changes to each of these ordinance types. For basic

information on regulatory plan implementation tools, please refer to Section 9.1 of the

and Trends Report

Burnett County, please refer to Section 9.3 of the

Inventory. For further detail on the status of each type of implementation ordinance inInventory and Trends Report.

Code of Ordinances

Current Status

The Town of Wood River has not adopted its ordinances as a code of ordinances. The town

administers the following ordinances:

Name of Ordinance Date Adopted

Building Permit Fees July 9, 2002

Slow No Wake February 7, 2002

Driveway Ordinance July 9, 2002

Public Safety Services September 13, 2006

User Fee Public Safety Services September 14, 2006

Joint Fire Protection District 2006

Town Plan Commission December 2007

Uniform Dwelling Code December 2009

Comprehensive Plan Public

Participation Plan

December 2007

Recommended Changes

Follow the statutory procedure for creating a code of ordinances. All existing and future

ordinances should be adopted as part of the town’s municipal code. The code is easier to

manage and more efficient, especially during times of political and administrative succession

or transition.

Zoning

Current Status

The Burnett County Zoning Ordinance establishes the county’s basic land use, lot size, and

building location and height requirements. The Burnett County Zoning Ordinance applies to

unincorporated areas of the county in towns that have adopted the ordinance. To date, all

towns except the Towns of Blaine, La Follette, Sand Lake, and Wood River have adopted the

Burnett County Zoning Ordinance. The Town of Wood River’s zoning information is

displayed on Map 9-1 and Table 9-1.

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Recommended Changes

Zoning ordinances will be one of the key tools that the Town of Wood River will need to

utilize to implement its comprehensive plan. For the sake of efficiency and consistency, the

town prefers to work with Burnett County to modify county zoning ordinances for

achievement of the town’s vision for the future. A more effective zoning ordinance will be

utilized to:

Promote housing options

Preserve agricultural lands and the right to farm

Preserve natural resources and cultural resources including rural character

Implement the town’s site planning policies

Better achieve the town’s desired development pattern

Better manage potentially conflicting land uses.

Table 9-1

Zoning, Town of Wood River

Zoning Classification Acreage Percent of Total

A (Exclusive Agriculture District) 0.1 0.0%

A1 (Agriculture--Transition District) 0.0 0.0%

A2 (Agriculture--Residential District) 2,650.8 69.9%

A4 (AG\Forestry]\Residential District) 0.0 0.0%

AP (Airport District) 0.0 0.0%

C1 (Commercial District) 0.0 0.0%

F1 (Forestry District) 75.7 2.0%

I1 (Industrial District) 0.0 0.0%

PUD (Planned Unit Development) 0.0 0.0%

RR1 (Residential Recreational District #1) 610.7 16.1%

RR2 (Residential Recreational District #2) 86.7 2.3%

RR3 (Residential Recreational District #3) 98.3 2.6%

W1 (Resource Conservation District) 272.0 7.2%

Shoreland Zoning* 6,419.9

TOTAL ZONED LAND** 3,794.2 100.0%

TOTAL TOWN LAND 22,810.9

* Shoreland zoning is not counted in the total as it overlays the underlying zoning.

**Does not include unzoned land, tribal land, surface water, or roads.

Source: Burnett County

Burnett County,

Wisconsin

EXISTING LAND

USE REGULATIONS

TOWN OF WOOD RIVER

This drawing is neither a legally recorded map nor a survey and is

not intended to be used as one. This drawing is a compilation of

records, information and data used for reference purposes only.

Source: Wisconsin DOT and Burnett Co Land Information Office

X:/GB/IE/2008/08B042/GIS/mxd/zoning/burnett_co_wood_river_zoning.mxd

December 10, 2009 Drawn by: DAT Checked by: JDW

0 1,600 3,200

Feet

³

3

5 4

8

2 1

9

6

7

1

6

7

11

26

13

29

34 35

20

17

21 23

32

14

24

22

12

25

33

16

10

15

28 27

36

31

30

19

13 18

24

12

25

36

31

30

19

18

1 6 5 4

34 35 36

3

33

2

32

1

31

36 31

BLAINE

SWISS

RUSK

SIREN

UNION

ANDERSON

SCOTT

DANIELS DEWEY

LINCOLN MEENON

WEST MARSHLAND

OAKLAND JACKSON

SAND LAKE

WEBB LAKE

LA FOLLETTE

TRADE LAKE ROOSEVELT

GRANTSBURG WOOD RIVER

Burnett County

MAP 9 - 1

Legend

Base Layers

PLSS Sections

Village Boundary

Town Boundary

Wetlands

Zoning Districts

A (Exclusive Agriculture District)

A-1 (Agriculture - Transition District)

A-2 (Agriculture - Residential District)

A-4 (AG\Forestry\Residential District)

AP (Airport District)

C-1 (Commercial District)

F-1 (Forestry District)

I-1 (Industrial District)

PUD (Planned Unit Development)

RR1 (Residential Recreational District #1)

RR2 (Residential Recreation District #2)

RR3 (Residential Recreation District #3)

W1 (Resource Conservation District)

Extra Territorial Plat

Review Jurisdiction

State Highway

County Highway

Town Road

Rivers

Lakes

County Boundary

No Zoning

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On a fundamental level, the town will need to work with Burnett County to amend or create

new zoning districts and to revise the town zoning map. This will help implement the town’s

preferred land uses and densities as established under the Future Land Use Management

Areas. Coordination will be necessary between the towns in Burnett County as efficiency

and cost management will be primary considerations at the county level.

Figure 9-2

County Zoning Coordination Evaluation Criteria

Zoning Draft Development:

Coordination and Evaluation Criteria

Critical to County/Town Mutual Benefits

Effectiveness

Effectiveness in implementing local

and County Comprehensive Plans

Ease of Ongoing Administration

and Cost Efficiency

Time and effort required to administer

and use the density management

system on a day to day basis

Ease of Initial Implementation and

Cost Efficiency

Time, effort, and cost to initially

implement the density management

system

Simplicity

Ease of understanding by the general

public

Flexibility

Amount of options available to individual

towns to implement preferred land use

management density and lot size

provisions (within County Framework)

Potential for Success

Potential for success in achieving local

and county goals – developing win-win

solutions

Burnett County and all towns under county zoning or considering adopting zoning

administered through Burnett County will need to consider the evaluation criteria as

represented in Figure 9-2. Each town in Burnett County has their own ideas on how to

manage land use, but there is similarity in the goals in which the comprehensive plans were

developed. The County and Town Comprehensive Plans were developed based on an overall

county-wide framework to establish consistency across the county, yet provide enough local

flexibility for towns to manage their respective community per their individual plan. Towns

were encouraged to develop specific strategies and policies to best fit local needs during the

planning process. The intent of coordination a County Zoning Ordinance update is to help

implement both county and local plans by providing a framework of consistent regulations

that will implement many of the local strategies and policies. Assuming the process will be

coordinated similar to the county planning process, the Zoning Ordinance revisions will also

provide many options for the Towns to customize the zoning districts to meet local needs

while recognizing the constraints of administrative costs.

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In regard to modifying or updating the zoning maps to help implement the comprehensive

plan, the Future Land Use Map should not simply become the zoning map. The

comprehensive plan and associated Future Land Use Map are not intended to be so detailed

that they try to predict what the future land uses might be (no one has a crystal ball). The

Future Land Use Map is intended to be more general to reflect the goals and capture the long

term intent of creating or preserving community character. The Future Land Use Map should

be kept more general and have written policy guidance for how to address rezonings, land

division, development applications, etc. In many instances the plan goals, objectives, polices

and recommendations will be more important than the future land use map as they

collectively manage community decisions.

In addition to the revision of the basic zoning districts and map, the town hopes to employ

several tools to help review and coordinate development including the following:

Development review standards and processes

Conditional use review criteria

Proposed modifications to the County Zoning Ordinance should also include provisions for

impacts assessment. Land divisions, conditional uses, and other substantial development

projects should be required to include an assessment of potential transportation, natural

resource, and cost of community service impacts. The level of impacts assessment required

should be reasonable and proportional to the intensity of the proposed development. In

addition to requesting developers and permit applicants to provide an assessment of these

potential impacts, the town should request that multiple site development alternatives are

provided as part of the development review process.

Site planning regulations (further detailed under Land Division Regulations below)

Land Division Regulations

Current Status

The Burnett County Subdivision Ordinance applies to the town and requires county approval

of land divisions that result in the creation of one or more parcels of five acres or less in size.

Refer to Section 9.3 of the

ordinances.

Recommended Changes

Land division ordinances will be another key tool that the Town of Wood River will need to

utilize to implement its comprehensive plan. For the sake of efficiency and consistency, the

town prefers to work with Burnett County to modify the County Subdivision Ordinance for

achievement of the town’s vision for the future. Similar to the Zoning Ordinance, the town

and county must cooperate and coordinate the proposed modifications in accordance with

Figure 9-2 to seek the win-win solutions that benefit both parties without negative impact to

administration. However, should this approach fall short in implementing the town’s plan,

the town would consider adopting a local ordinance.

Inventory and Trends Report for details on existing county

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Figure 9-3

Burnett County Comprehensive Planning County/Local Coordinated

Decision Making Process

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In order to better manage new town roads or other public infrastructure dedications

associated with new development, the town should improve subdivision ordinance provisions

for the execution of development agreements. A standard development agreement should be

assembled that includes provisions for financial assurance, construction warranties, and

construction inspections,

In accordance with Figure 9-3, clear communication between the town and the county is

paramount if a shared development review process is to work correctly. It is important to

note that the county zoning and subdivision ordinances determine when this process is

invoked as the ordinances are administered by Burnett County.

Opportunities for town involvement occur when proposed land uses or land developments

require a decision on the part of Burnett County. Such decisions include rezones, conditional

uses, and land divisions, and could be expanded to include site plan review. As a town

reviews a proposed land use and forwards its decision or recommendation to the county,

town decisions should be documented and copied to the county. County decisions should be

documented in this same manner and copied to the applicable towns. This process tool gets

both units of government using their plans and speaking the same language.

This approach has several advantages. Even if it is the county’s position that it will generally

follow a town’s recommendation, the communication still needs to be clear. The reason for

this is because the town and the county are not the only ones involved. The public is also

involved, so just agreeing with the town will not eliminate the potential for conflict. And

after 2010, the comprehensive planning law makes it even more important that communities

clearly document their reasoning when making decisions that should be “consistent” with the

comprehensive plan. If a citizen, applicant, developer, etc. challenges a decision of a town or

county, they will have a much more difficult challenge winning against the unit of

government if the reasoning for a decision is clearly documented and connected to

comprehensive plan policies.

Site Plan and Design Review

Current Status

Site plan and design review standards are not currently administered by the town. Refer to

Section 9.3 of the

ordinances. Site design refers to the overall layout of the site and the relationship of major

features such as buildings, streets, parking and supporting elements.

Recommended Changes

The town does intend to review development applications in conjunction with the Plan

Commission. Site planning is not intended to be invasive to the applicant, but is intended to

allow the town to manage growth in conjunction with property owners to accomplish town

goals. Similar to the zoning and land division ordinance discussions, it is anticipated Burnett

County will incorporate basic site design requirements and standards as part of the county

code, especially for proposed commercial, industrial, institutional, and multi-family

residential developments. This will likely be a cooperative effort between the Town of Wood

River and Burnett County, the surrounding towns, and possibly with incorporated

Inventory and Trends Report for details on related, Burnett County

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communities as well. Site plan and design review requirements may address the desired

characteristics of building layout and architecture, park areas, green space and landscaping,

lighting, signage, grading, driveway access, and internal traffic circulation. The example

denoted in Figure 9-4 represents a sample of potential considerations associated with site

review.

Figure 9-4

Typical Site Design Example

1. Building Location and Setbacks

Buildings should be located to strengthen the definition of street edges and public areas.

Building setbacks should also be consistent with those of buildings located on adjacent

properties.

2. Parking Lot Configurations and Location

Parking lots should be designed to accommodate convenient vehicular navigation.

Generally, two-way drive aisles should be 24 feet wide and non-handicapped accessible

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spaces should be 9 wide by 18 feet deep. Dead-end aisles should be avoided where

possible, but shall include a vehicle turn-around when used.

Parking lots should also be arranged to provide convenient access to buildings and

primarily located to the sides or rear and between buildings.

3. Public Space

The integration of public areas including court yards, plazas and gardens into the site is

encouraged. These spaces should be defined by surrounding buildings, street edges,

landscaping and natural areas.

4. Service/Mechanical/Refuse Location

Service and storage areas, building mechanicals, and refuse/recycling containers should

be located so that they are hidden from public view to the greatest extent possible.

5. Storm Water Configuration

Storm water retention and detention areas should be designed to enhance the landscape

through the use of natural forms and grading as opposed to rigid geometric shapes.

Additional Standards

spaces, and residential areas shall receive the highest priority for architectural

treatment and design treatment.

Building Elevation Priority Building elevations visible from public streets, public

preferred over chain link fences. Chain link fences should be used only when there is

a demonstrated security need.

Fences Decorative fences made of wood, masonry, stone and ornamental metal are

from adjacent properties.

Figure 9-4 represents a sample of what the town/county might assess if a development is

proposed. It may not be typical or even necessary that all of the site plan criteria be included

on a submitted site plan. Figure 9-4 was included to allow a reference in the need of an

advanced development review. In addition, the town/county should seek public input on the

establishment of these desired characteristics. The policies of the

Lighting Site lighting shall be provided for safety and security and directed awayEconomic Development

element provide some initial guidance on potential design review standards.

Site planning can not only be used to provide for aesthetically pleasing development and

protection of valued features of the landscape, but also to ensure that future road extensions

will not blocked by the construction of buildings or other structures. Area development plans

will be required of major land divisions and commercial or industrial development proposals.

These plans will lay out potential road extensions on adjacent lands. To ensure potential

future road connectivity between development sites, the town’s policies regarding the use of

cul-de-sacs should be included in a revised land division ordinance. Temporary cul-de-sacs

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9-15

should be limited, but when allowed, should be constructed to the outside property line of the

development site.

Official Map Regulations

Current Status

An official map is not currently administered by the town. Refer to Section 9.3 of the

Inventory and Trends Report

Recommended Changes

Area development planning and site planning will be used to encourage coordinated planning

between development sites, but the need for an official map may also develop over the

planning period. The town should monitor the need to develop an official map that

designates planned, future rights-of-way for roads and utilities in areas of expected growth.

for details on related, Burnett County ordinances.

Sign Regulations

Current Status

Sign regulations are not currently administered by the town. Refer to Section 9.3 of the

Inventory and Trends Report

Recommended Changes

No specific recommendations regarding sign regulations have been identified, however, sign

placement and design should be addressed by the site plan and design review ordinance.

for details on related, Burnett County ordinances.

Erosion Control and Stormwater Management

Current Status

Erosion control and stormwater management ordinances are not currently administered by

the town. Erosion control and stormwater management are addressed by the Burnett County

Zoning, Subdivision, Shoreland Zoning, and Non-Metallic Mining Reclamation Ordinances,

which are in effect in the Town of Wood River. Refer to Section 9.3 of the

Trends Report

Recommended Changes

The town will modify applicable land division, zoning, and building code ordinances to

include improved stormwater management and construction site erosion control

requirements. Development proposals will be required to address stormwater management,

construction site erosion control, and potential increased risk of flooding in accordance with

existing state and county standards.

Inventory andfor details on related, Burnett County ordinances.

Historic Preservation

Current Status

Historic preservation ordinances are not currently administered by the town. Refer to Section

9.3 of the

Inventory and Trends Report for details on related, Burnett County ordinances.

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9-16 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Recommended Changes

The town would like to create a local historic preservation document that recognizes, but

does not regulate, historic sites in the town. To support this effort, the town should consider

maintaining the map and database of historic and archeological sites and will conduct a

community survey of historical and archeological resources at least once every 20 years.

Additional research and public outreach are necessary before proceeding with creating such

an ordinance.

Building, Housing, and Mechanical Codes

Current Status

Building, housing, and mechanical codes are not currently administered by the town. Refer to

Section 9.3 of the Inventory and Trends Report for details on related, Burnett County

ordinances.

Recommended Changes

No specific recommendations have been brought forward in regard to creating building,

housing, and mechanical codes.

Sanitary Codes

Current Status

The Burnett County Sanitary Ordinance applies to the town. Refer to Section 9.3 of the

Inventory and Trends Report

Recommended Changes

for details on related Burnett County ordinances.

continue to work with Burnett County for the regulation of POWTS.

No specific changes to sanitary codes are recommended at this time, but the town should

Driveway and Access Controls

Current Status

Driveway and access controls are currently administered by the town. Refer to Section 9.3 of

the

Recommended Changes

The town should continue to enforce the driveway and access control and ensure that the

following areas of concern should be addressed by the ordinance:

Inventory and Trends Report for details on related, Burnett County ordinances.

Minimum distance between access points

Maximum number of access points per parcel

Minimum site distance

Minimum driveway surface width and construction materials

Minimum clearance width and height

Maximum driveway length

Minimum turnaround areas for longer driveways

Minimum intersection spacing.

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9-17

Road Construction Specifications

Current Status

Road construction specifications are not currently administered by the town. Refer to

Section 9.3 of the Inventory and Trends Report for details on related, Burnett County

ordinances.

Recommended Changes

The town utilizes Wisconsin State Statutes 82.50 which provides minimum standards for

roads. The town should develop a set of road construction specifications to include modern

requirements for road base, surfacing, and drainage construction. Construction specifications

should be adjustable based on the planned functional classification or expected traffic flow of

a roadway.

9.3 Non-Regulatory Land Use Management Tools

While ordinances and other regulatory tools are often central in plan implementation, they are

not the only means available to a community. Non-regulatory implementation tools include

more detailed planning efforts (such as park planning, neighborhood planning, or road

improvement planning), public participation tools, intergovernmental agreements, land

acquisition, and various fiscal tools (such as capital improvement planning, impact fees, grant

funding, and annual budgeting). For basic information on non-regulatory plan implementation

tools, please refer to Section 9.2 of the

The

implementation tools including the following:

Inventory and Trends Report.Town of Wood River Comprehensive Plan includes recommendations for the use of nonregulatory

Assess the availability of land for residential development (Housing element).

Review ordinances and fees for their impacts on housing (Housing element).

Pursue funding for needed transportation facilities (Transportation element).

Community Facilities

Utilize intergovernmental efficiencies to provide services and facilities (Utilities andelement).

(

Assess service and capacity needs including town buildings, staffing, and equipmentUtilities and Community Facilities element).

and Cultural Resources

Maintain the map and database of historic and archeological sites (Agricultural, Natural,element).

program (

Work with the County on the purchase of development rights and/or a donated easementAgricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources element).

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9-18 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

and government (

Support and participate in educational and training programs with local industry, schools,Economic Development element).

Meet with other units of government (Intergovernmental Cooperation element).

Review and update the comprehensive plan (Implementation element).

9.4 Comprehensive Plan Amendments and Updates

Adoption and Amendments

The Town of Wood River should regularly evaluate its progress toward achieving the goals,

objectives, policies, and recommendations of its comprehensive plan. It may be determined that

amendments are needed to maintain the effectiveness and consistency of the plan. Amendments

are minor changes to the overall plan and should be done after careful evaluation to maintain the

plan as an effective tool upon which community decisions are based.

According to Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning law (Wis. Stats. 66.1001), the same process

that was used to initially adopt the plan shall also be used when amendments are made. The

town should be aware that laws regarding the amendment procedure may be clarified or changed

as more comprehensive plans are adopted, and should therefore be monitored over time. Under

current law, adopting and amending the town’s comprehensive plan must comply with the

following steps:

be followed and must provide an opportunity for written comments to be submitted by

members of the public to the Town Board and for the Town Board to respond to such

comments.

Public Participation Procedures. The established public participation procedures must

comprehensive plan or amendment to the Town Board by adopting a resolution by a

majority vote of the entire Plan Commission. The vote shall be recorded in the minutes

of the Plan Commission. The resolution shall refer to maps and other descriptive

materials that relate to one or more elements of the comprehensive plan.

Plan Commission Recommendation. The Plan Commission recommends its proposed

adopted by the Plan Commission for recommendation to the Town Board is required to

be sent to: (a) every governmental body that is located in whole or in part within the

boundaries of the town, including any school district, sanitary district, public inland lake

protection and rehabilitation district, or other special district; (b) the clerk of every

Village, village, town, county, and regional planning commission that is adjacent to the

town; (c) the Wisconsin Land Council; (d) the Department of Administration; (e) the

Regional Planning Commission in which the town is located; (f) the public library that

serves the area in which the town is located; and (g) persons who have leasehold interest

in an affected property for the extraction of non-metallic minerals. After adoption by the

Recommended Draft Distribution. One copy of the comprehensive plan or amendment

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9-19

Town Board, one copy of the adopted comprehensive plan or amendment must also be

sent to (a) through (f) above.

amending ordinance, persons that have requested to receive notice must be provided with

notice of the public hearing and a copy of the adopting ordinance. This only applies if

the proposed plan or amendment affects the allowable use of their property. The town is

responsible for maintaining the list of persons who have requested to receive notice, and

may charge a fee to recover the cost of providing the notice.

Public Notification. At least 30 days before the public hearing on a plan adopting or

a public hearing must be held to consider an ordinance to adopt or amend the

comprehensive plan. Ordinance approval requires a majority vote of the Town Board.

The final plan report or amendment and adopting ordinance must then be filed with (a)

through (f) of the distribution list above that received the recommended comprehensive

plan or amendment.

Ordinance Adoption and Final Distribution. Following publication of a Class I notice,

Updates

Comprehensive planning statutes require that a comprehensive plan be updated at least once

every 10 years. However, it is advisable to conduct a plan update at a five year interval. An

update requires revisiting the entire planning document. Unlike an amendment, an update is

often a substantial re-write of the text, updating of the inventory and tables, and substantial

changes to maps, if necessary. The plan update process should be planned for in a similar

manner as was allowed for the initial creation of this plan including similar time and funding

allotments. State statutes should also be monitored for any modified language.

9.5 Integration and Consistency of Planning Elements

Implementation Strategies for Planning Element Integration

While this comprehensive plan is divided into nine elements, in reality, community planning

issues are not confined to these divisions. Planning issues will cross these element boundaries.

Because this is the case, the policies and recommendations of this plan were considered by the

Town of Wood River in the light of overall implementation strategies. The following

implementation strategies were available for consideration.

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9-20 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Housing

1.

Create a range of housing options

2.

affordable housing

Create opportunities for siting of quality

3.

manufactured homes

Change the treatment of mobile and

Transportation

1. Create efficiencies in the cost of building

and maintaining roads (control taxes)

2. Preserve the mobility of collector and/or

arterial roads

3. Create safe emergency vehicle access to

developed properties

4. Create improved intersection safety

5. Create more detailed plans for

transportation improvements

6. Create road connectivity

7. Create bicycle and pedestrian options

Utilities and Community Facilities

1. Create efficiencies in the cost of providing

services and facilities (control taxes)

2. Create more detailed plans for facility and

service improvements

3. Create intergovernmental efficiencies for

providing services and facilities

4. Create improved community facilities and

services

5. Preserve the existing level and quality of

community facilities and services

6. Preserve the quality of outdoor recreational

pursuits.

7. Create additional public recreation

facilities

8. Create opportunities to maximize the use of

existing infrastructure

Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources

1. Preserve agricultural lands

2. Preserve the right to farm

3. Preserve active farms

4. Preserve natural resources and/or green

space

5. Preserve rural character

6. Create targeted areas for farming

expansion

7. Create targeted areas for forestry expansion

8. Preserve historic places and features

Economic Development

1. Change community conditions for

attracting business and job growth

2. Change community conditions for retaining

existing businesses and jobs

3. Create additional tax base by requiring

quality development and construction

4. Create more specific plans for economic

development

Intergovernmental Cooperation

1. Create intergovernmental efficiencies for

providing services and facilities

2. Create a cooperative approach for planning

and regulating development along

community boundaries

3. Preserve intergovernmental communication

Land Use

1. Preserve the existing landscape by limiting

growth

2. Preserve valued features of the landscape

through site planning

3. Preserve development rights

4. Create an overall pattern of growth that is

dispersed

5. Create an overall pattern of growth that is

clustered

6. Create an overall pattern of growth that is

concentrated

7. Preserve the influence of market forces to

drive the type and location of development

8. Create a system of development review

that prevents land use conflicts

9. Create a system of development review

that manages the location and design of

non-residential development

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9-21

These overall strategies are grouped by element, but are associated with goals, objectives,

policies and recommendations in multiple elements.

Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning law requires that the

how each of the nine elements of the comprehensive plan will be integrated with the other

elements of the plan. The implementation strategies provide planning element integration by

grouping associated policies and recommendations in multiple elements with coherent,

overarching themes.

The Town of Wood River selected from the available strategies to generate its policies and

recommendations. The selected implementation strategies reflect the town’s highest priorities

for implementation, and areas where the town is willing to take direct implementation

responsibility. Each planning element has very detailed goals and objectives that set the course

of action, followed and supported by detailed and specific polices and recommendations that

enable the goal fulfillment. The goals, objectives, policies and recommendations represent the

selected strategies the town felt were important enough to focus on over the planning period.

Implementation element describe

Planning Element Consistency

Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning law requires that the

how each of the nine elements of the comprehensive plan will be made consistent with the other

elements of the plan. The planning process that was used to create the

2030 Comprehensive Plan

manner. No elements were created independently from the other elements of the plan, therefore

reducing the threat of inconsistency.

There may be inconsistencies between the goals and objectives between elements or even within

an individual element. This is the nature of goals and objectives. Because these are statements

of community values, they may very well compete with one another in certain situations. The

mechanism for resolving any such inconsistency is the policy statement. Where goals or

objectives express competing values, the town should look to the related policies to provide

decision making guidance. The policies established by this plan have been designed with this

function in mind, and no known policy inconsistencies are present between elements or within an

individual element.

Over time, the threat of inconsistency between the plan and existing conditions will increase,

requiring amendments or updates to be made. Over time, additional plans regarding specific

features within the community may also be developed (e.g., outdoor recreation plan, downtown

development plan, etc.). The process used to develop any further detailed plans should be

consistent with this

Implementation element describeTown of Wood River Yearrequired all elements of the plan to be produced in a simultaneousTown of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan.

9.6 Measurement of Plan Progress

Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning law requires that the

mechanism to measure community progress toward achieving all aspects of the comprehensive

plan. An acceptable method is to evaluate two primary components of the plan, policies and

recommendations, which are found in each plan element.

Implementation element provide a

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9-22 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

To measure the effectiveness of an adopted policy, the community must determine if the policy

has met the intended purpose. For example, the Town of Wood River has established a

Transportation element policy that states, “Dead-end roads and cul-de-sacs shall be avoided to

the extent practicable and allowed only where physical site features prevent connection with

existing or planned future roadways.” To determine whether the policy is achieving the

community’s intention a “measure” must be established. In the case of this policy, the measure

is simply how many dead-end roads or cul-de-sacs have been constructed since the plan’s

adoption, and how many of those were necessitated by the site conditions. Each policy statement

should be reviewed periodically to determine the plan’s effectiveness.

Likewise, recommendations listed within each element can be measured. For recommendations,

the ability to “measure” progress toward achievement is very straight forward in that the

recommendations have either been implemented or not.

To ensure the plan is achieving intended results, periodic reviews should be conducted by the

Plan Commission and results reported to the governing body and the public.

9.7 Implementation Goals and Objectives

Community goals are broad, value-based statements expressing public preferences for the long

term (20 years or more). They specifically address key issues, opportunities, and problems that

affect the community. Objectives are more specific than goals and are more measurable

statements usually attainable through direct action and implementation of plan recommendations.

The accomplishment of objectives contributes to fulfillment of the goal.

Goal 1:

recommendations with the ordinances and implementation tools that affect the town

Promote consistent integration of the comprehensive plan policies and.

Objectives:

A. Update and/or revise the comprehensive plan on a regular schedule (at least every 5

years) to ensure that the plan remains a useful guide for land use decision making.

B. Require that administration, enforcement, and implementation of land use regulations are

consistent with the town comprehensive plan, where applicable.

C. Develop and update as needed an “Action Plan” as a mechanism to assist the Town

Board to bring implementation tools into compliance with the comprehensive plan.

Goal 2:

community interests and goals.

Objectives:

Balance appropriate land use regulations and individual property rights with

A. Provide continuing education to the public that will lead to a more complete

understanding of planning and land use issues facing the town.

B. Create opportunities for citizen participation throughout all stages of planning, ordinance

development, and policy implementation.

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C. Maintain an implementation tool development review process whereby all interested

parties are afforded an opportunity to influence the outcome.

D. Maintain a land use (agricultural, industrial, commercial, and residential) development

review process whereby all interested parties are afforded an opportunity to influence the

outcome.

9.8 Implementation Policies and Recommendations

Policies and recommendations build on goals and objectives by providing more focused

responses to the issues that the town is concerned about. Policies and recommendations become

primary tools the town can use in making land use decisions. Many of the policies and

recommendations cross element boundaries and work together toward overall implementation

strategies. Refer to Section 9.5 for an explanation of the strategies cited as sources for many of

the policies and recommendations.

Policies identify the way in which activities are conducted in order to fulfill the goals and

objectives. Policies that direct action using the word “shall” are advised to be mandatory and

regulatory aspects of the implementation of the comprehensive plan. In contrast, those policies

that direct action using the words “will” or “should” are advisory and intended to serve as a

guide. “Will” statements are considered to be strong guidelines, while “should” statements are

considered loose guidelines.

Recommendations are specific actions or projects that the town should be prepared to complete.

The completion of these actions and projects is consistent with the town’s policies, and therefore

will help the town fulfill the comprehensive plan goals and objectives.

Policies and Recommendations

I 1. The Town maintains the comprehensive plan as an effective tool for the guidance of

Town governance, and will update the plan as needed to maintain consistency with

state comprehensive planning requirements.

I 2. Town policies, ordinances, and decisions relative to zoning, land divisions and

subdivisions, shoreland-wetland zoning, and official mapping shall be made in

conformance with the comprehensive plan.

I 3. Maintain funding for continued provision of planning services toward the

implementation of the comprehensive plans.

I 4. Develop and maintain an action plan that identifies specific projects that are to be

completed toward the implementation of the comprehensive plan. An action plan

identifies an estimated time frame and responsible parties for each project or action.

I 5. The action plan located within the comprehensive plan will be updated when tasks are

accomplished and new items will be added when appropriate.

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9-24 Town of Wood River Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan

I 6. Review the comprehensive plan annually (in conjunction with the Town budgeting

process) for performance on goals, objectives, policies, and recommendations, for

availability of updated data, and to provide an opportunity for public feedback. This

review does not need to be as formal as the comprehensive review required at least

every 10 years by Ch. 66.1001, Wisconsin Statutes.

I 7. The Town Planning Commission has the responsibility to review and make a

recommendation of any proposed amendments to the zoning ordinance, official map,

shoreland zoning ordinance and subdivision ordinance, etc. affecting the Town.

I 8. If the Town should experience substantial land use or land use regulation changes

within the planning period, maps which represent these features will be updated to

ensure the most accurate information is utilized in community decision making.

I 9. Maps will be used in coordination with established Town goals and objectives to

ensure the consistency plan’s text as well as maps and/or other graphics.

I 10. Every five years the Town will evaluate the availability of funds for updating the

comprehensive plan. If adequate funds are not available then a strategy will be

developed to ensure that sufficient funds are available for a comprehensive plan

update.

I 11. The annual review of the comprehensive plan will be done in a committee format

with public involvement in an un-biased manner.

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Appendix A

Public Participation Plan and Survey Results

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Town Adopted Public Participation Plan to be Inserted Here

Town Survey Results to be Inserted Here

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BURNETT COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING PUBLIC OPINION SURVEY

Town of Wood River

During the summer of 2009, the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin – River Falls sent

comprehensive planning public opinion surveys to 132 residents and property owners in the Town of Wood

River. A total of 55 questionnaires were returned for a return rate of 42 percent. This number of returned

surveys will provide estimates that are expected to be accurate to within plus or minus 13 percent.

1. Mark the three (3) most important reasons you and your family choose to live in Burnett County:

(Mark (

) three only)

4% Agriculture 2% Community services and facilities 2% Health care services

9% Quality schools 16% Near job/employment opportunities 36% Near family and friends

11% Cost of home 36% Recreational opportunities 4% Low property taxes

4% Low crime rate 65% Small town atmosphere/rural lifestyle 5% Quality neighborhood

53% Natural beauty 40% Proximity to Twin Cities 7% Other:

2. Rate the quality of the following services and facilities:

Excellent Good Fair Poor No Opinion

a. County parks 4% 62% 19% 0% 15%

b. County public health services 4% 44% 15% 0% 37%

c. County road maintenance 4% 50% 39% 6% 2%

d. County recycling programs 6% 43% 28% 9% 15%

e. County zoning code enforcement 0% 28% 22% 19% 31%

f. County building code enforcement 0% 31% 17% 13% 39%

g. County nuisance ordinance enforcement 0% 21% 26% 19% 34%

h. Emergency dispatch service

i. Police protection/law enforcement 7% 52% 24% 4% 13%

j. Fire protection 11% 54% 24% 2% 9%

k. Public libraries 28% 43% 6% 0% 23%

l. Local public school system 30% 43% 4% 0% 24%

m. Wireless telecommunication service 6% 21% 25% 25% 25%

n. Local Town/Village hall 2% 47% 30% 4% 17%

o. Local Town/Village road maintenance 4% 52% 26% 11% 7%

Excellent Good Fair Poor No Opinion

(911) 6% 46% 15% 0% 33%

3. How would you rate the overall quality of

life in Burnett County?

11% 76% 13% 0% 0%

4. Which two of the following ways of paying for the costs associated with growth and development

do you prefer? (Mark (

) two only)

Development

impact fees

User

fees Taxes No

Opinion

a. Paying for public infrastructure

b. Paying for public services

(e.g. roads) 27% 38% 40% 15%(e.g. police protection) 7% 24% 69% 16%

- 2 -

5. Provide your opinion on the following statements:

Strongly

Agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly

Disagree

No

Opinion

a. The location of new residential development should

be managed to ensure efficient delivery of public

services

.

18% 55% 18% 0% 10%

b. Community services

be provided jointly by communities if money can be

saved & service quality is maintained.

27% 62% 10% 0% 2%

c. My community should coordinate with the county and

neighboring communities to plan for an aging

population’s housing needs.

25% 61% 6% 2% 6%

d. Burnett County communities should pool resources

to attract/retain companies that will create jobs. 33% 58% 6% 0% 4%

e. It is important to support the preservation of

productive agricultural land in my community. 38% 45% 8% 4% 6%

f. There is too much farmland being converted to nonfarm

uses in my community. 19% 27% 35% 4% 15%

g. Ag uses should be restricted close to residences. 8% 25% 42% 13% 12%

h. New residential development should be located

away from agricultural operations. 12% 56% 19% 2% 12%

i. Identifying and protecting historical sites and

structures is important to me. 19% 64% 4% 0% 13%

j. Additional use of roads for motorized all-terrain

vehicles

k. ATV infrastructure

(schools, police, fire, etc.) should(ATVs) is needed in my community. 7% 20% 37% 28% 7%(trails, signage, maintenance, etc.)

should be funded through user fees. 48% 46% 0% 2% 4%

6. Assume that you are in charge of allocating the county budget:

There is a $100 surplus.

Distribute it among the

following:

There is a $100 deficit.

Balance the budget by

cutting it from the following:

a. Emergency services

b. Recreation

landings, parks, etc.)

c. Environment

protection, shoreline preservation, etc.)

d. Social services $8 $20

e. Economic development $7 $14

f. Roads and bridges $14 $7

g. Education $18 $8

h. Taxes $26

(police, fire, ambulance) $11 $5(trail development/maintenance, boat$6 $22(aquatic invasive species$11 $15(decrease) $10 (increase)

Total = must add to 100 $100 $100

7. The county is exploring strategies to improve the wireless communication network and recognizes

that maintaining the “Northwoods Character” is central to the quality of life for its residents. With

this in mind, it is more important to allow: (Mark (

) one only)

Fewer, but taller communication towers More, but shorter communication towers No Opinion

48% 12% 40%

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8. With respect to internet service at your residence in Burnett County, do you currently have:

Dial-up modem High speed/broadband

22% 33% 45% 0%

(e.g. DSL) None Don’t know

9. If you have (or could have) access to broadband internet service, how often do (or would) you work

from home in Burnett County?

Wouldn’t work from home Less than 1 day/week 1 – 2 days/week 3 or more days/week

60% 6% 23% 12%

10. Historically, some recreational-oriented commercial uses have been allowed on waterfront property

adjacent to residential development. Which of the following commercial uses may be appropriate

in these areas? (Mark (

) all that apply)

58% Restaurants and cocktail lounges 56% Bed and Breakfasts 13% Hotels/motels

40% Sporting goods and bait sales 56% Resorts 33% Marinas

16% None of the above are appropriate 2% Other

11. Seasonal residents are those that have their primary residence outside of Burnett County, but have

a secondary residence within the County. In some cases, these residences are rented out on a

short-term basis when not occupied by the owner. Please provide your opinion on the following

conditions as they apply to short-term seasonal rentals:

Strongly

Agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly

Disagree

No

Opinion

a. The septic system should be designed and

maintained to support the number of guests 41% 50% 2% 2% 6%

b. Neighbors should have access to owner contact

information 19% 55% 15% 6% 6%

c. Noise limits on outdoor use of the property

should be imposed

d. Landscaping along side property lines should be

required 4% 19% 43% 4% 31%

e. Reference checks of prospective renters should

be required 9% 47% 23% 4% 17%

f. Short-term rental of residential units should not

be allowed 4% 19% 50% 15% 13%

(late hours) 33% 56% 7% 0% 4%

12. Traditionally, rural housing developments have been designed on large lots as in the diagram

(Option A) on the left below. An alternative layout for rural housing is the “cluster” concept, which

has smaller lots and permanently preserved open space as in the diagram (Option B) on the right

below. Each option contains the same number of homes. Please mark which one you prefer:

38% Option A 62% Option B

- 4 -

13. Clustering of residential building lots should be required in order to preserve the following:

Strongly

Agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly

Disagree

No

Opinion

a. Productive agricultural land 29% 43% 12% 8% 8%

b. Forest land 35% 43% 12% 4% 6%

c. Rural open space 24% 54% 12% 4% 6%

d. Natural and environmental features 35% 47% 8% 4% 6%

14. What types of businesses/industries do you believe are the most important for Burnett County to

attract? Please rate each of the following (5=High Priority to 1=Low Priority):

5 4 3 2 1 No

Opinion

a. Agricultural related businesses 27% 21% 29% 13% 8% 2%

b. Commercial, retail, and services 12% 33% 37% 12% 6% 2%

c. Health care services 19% 35% 33% 10% 0% 4%

d. Industrial and manufacturing development 31% 37% 25% 2% 2% 2%

e. Downtown development – “Main Street” 26% 26% 23% 13% 6% 6%

f. Home based businesses 10% 14% 27% 24% 16% 10%

g. Tourism and recreation 19% 40% 25% 8% 8% 2%

h. Tech related businesses

(e.g. biotech, computers) 20% 41% 25% 10% 4% 0%

15. Residential density refers to the number of homes within a specific area and is usually expressed

as the “number of homes per acre” or “number of homes/acre”. For instance, two (2) homes within

a 40-acre area are twice as dense as one (1) home within a 40-acre area. Likewise, one (1) home

within a 20-acre area is twice as dense as one (1) home within a 40-acre area. What is the most

appropriate limit on density for each of the following non-waterfront areas outside of villages within

the county? Mark (

diagrams below to answer the questions.

) only one choice for each area described in a, b, and c. Use the table and

8 homes/

40 acres

= 1 home/

5 acres

4 homes/

40 acres

= 1 home/

10 acres

2 homes/

40 acres

= 1 home/

20 acres

1 home/

40 acres

(note that the placement of

the dots in the following

graphics does not

necessarily represent

where a home would be

built in the given residential

density option)

More

than

8 homes/

40 acres

Other

Density:

specify

No

Opinion

      

a.

be preserved & expanded

long-term

Ag areas - farming will

6% 12% 8% 18% 41% 2% 12%

b.

& harvested long-term

c.

d. Please provide any additional comments you have about residential density issues:

Forest areas -managed6% 14% 14% 27% 31% 0% 8%Other rural areas 12% 24% 20% 16% 12% 0% 14%

- 5 -

16. As development occurs over time in Burnett County, the most important things to preserve are:

(Mark (

) up to three)

36% Agriculture 40% Large areas of contiguous forests 18% Lakefront access

71%

4% None 2% Other

Water Quality 31% Views of the natural environment 71% Wildlife habitat

17. How much would you be willing to pay annually to help preserve your selections in Question 16?

23% $0 10% $10 23% $50

2% $5 25% $20 17% Other

18. What are your two (2) preferred methods of receiving information from Burnett County?

(Mark (

) two only):

Direct Mailing Newsletters Newspaper

Articles Radio Website Other

49% 44% 47% 9% 25% 4%

18a. If you chose radio in Q18, which radio station would you prefer to receive information from?

(Mark (

) one only)

WHWC 88.3

FM

WOJB 88.9

FM

WGMO 95.3

FM

WJMC 96.1

FM

WXCX 105.7

FM

WCMP 1350

AM /100.9 FM Other

0% 8% 8% 8% 17% 50% 8%

DEMOGRAPHICS:

Male Female 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+

Please tell us some things about you:

19. Gender:

72% 28%

20. Age:

0% 2% 10% 12% 29% 47%

High school

or less

Some

college

2-year college

degree

4-year college

degree

Grad/Professional

21. Highest level of

degree

formal education:

Less than

15,000

15,000 –

24,999

25,000 –

49,999

50,000 –

74,999

75,000 –

99,999

100,000

21% 21% 15% 23% 19%

22. Household Income

or more

Range:

2% 8% 31% 25% 16% 18%

23. Which of the following describes your residential status in Burnett County?

Full-time Seasonal

64% 34% 2%

(primary residence outside Burnett County) Non-resident

24. How many years have you resided or owned property in Burnett County?

Less than 1 year 1 – 5 years 6 – 10 years 11 – 15 years 16 – 20 years 20+ years

0% 4% 4% 6% 17% 70%

25. Total acres owned in Burnett County:

Less than 1 acre 1 – 5 acres 6 – 10 acres 11 – 20 acres 21 – 40 acres 40+ acres

19% 32% 6% 8% 11% 25%

- 6 -

26. If your residence within Burnett County is used seasonally:

a. How many months each year is it generally

used?

b. When occupied, how many people generally

use the residence at any given time?

0% Less than 1 month 0% 1

3% 1 month 43% 2

0% 2 months 3% 3

6% 3 months 14% 4

12% 4 months 6% 5

38% 5 or more months 6% 6 or more

41% Residence is not seasonal 29% Residence is not seasonal

27. Location of residence or land within Burnett County: (Mark (

) one only)

0% Anderson (Town) 0% Jackson (Town) 0% Rusk (Town) 0% Trade Lake (Town)

0% Blaine (Town) 0% La Follette (Town) 0% Sand Lake (Town) 0% Union (Town)

0% Daniels (Town) 0% Lincoln (Town) 0% Scott (Town) 0% Webb Lake (Town)

0% Dewey (Town) 0% Meenon (Town) 0% Siren (Town) 0% Webster (Village)

0% Grantsburg (Town) 0% Oakland (Town) 0% Siren (Village) 0%

West Marshland (Town)

0%

Grantsburg (Village) 0% Roosevelt (Town) 0% Swiss (Town) 100% Wood River (Town)

28. My residence within Burnett County is: (Mark (

) one only)

0% Within a village 15% A rural hobby farm residence

(not primary source income)

50% A shoreline residence 2% A rural farm residence

33% A rural non-farm residence 0% No residence in Burnett County

29. If you could change one (1) thing about Burnett County, what would it be?

Thank You for Completing the Survey! Your survey responses are anonymous and will be reported in group

form only.

Please return your survey in the enclosed postage-paid envelope by xxxxxx, 2009 to:

Survey Research Center

124 RDI Building

University of Wisconsin - River Falls

410 S. Third St.

River Falls, WI 54022-5001

 

 

 

X:\GB\IE\20088B042\Reports\Local Recommendations Reports\South Cluster\T Wood River\Recommended Draft\Draft Recommended Plan -

T Wood River 12-11-09.doc i

Plan Recommendations Report

Town of Wood River, Burnett County, Wisconsin
Highway 70, Alpha, WI 54840
Tel. 715-431-0230
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